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Author Topic: Lagenlook, Arty & non-Mainstream Inspiration & Chat  (Read 85420 times)

indigotiger

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Re: Lagenlook Inspiration & Chat
« Reply #35 on: February 04, 2017, 07:00:42 PM »

I just sent an email to Mrs Eccentric, via some older email addresses I had for her, hopefully she will check in here, I miss her point of view...

While the Krista Larson look isn't usually what I go for, I did notice that the new group of silk tafetta fabrics that Marcy Tilton has in her shop include ginghams and plaids that might lend themselves very well to things like an "underpinning skirt"
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Susan in Saint John

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Re: Lagenlook Inspiration & Chat
« Reply #36 on: February 04, 2017, 07:06:18 PM »

I heart that pattern, Susan. What type/color of fabric are you using?

Kathryn

Only in the smallest sizes could you use a 115 cm [45 inch] wide fabric.  As this was a test garment, I wanted to use stash fabric.  The piece I used has been around for a while.  I would describe it as a "tweedy" polyester suiting -- could be a blend.  The colours in it are grey, cream and a bit of blue or green.  It has some drape and is heavy enough that you could make a dress, jacket or pants out of it.  It's a bit heavy to be a blouse.  The pattern fabric suggestions include Stretch Poplin, Seersucker, Silk Dupioni, Lightweight Wool Crepe.  I should note that for a Vogue pattern, V1410 has wider than normal seam allowances so that that finished french seams are wide enough for the buttons and buttonholes.  The neck and armholes have 3/8" seam allowances which become narrow hems.  I used the Loes Hinse method -- serged the edges, turned them at 3/8" and top stitched them down.  My fabric was too thick to do that small a rolled or narrow hem.

I recently purchase a Surprise Box from Kaliyana http://shonmodern.com/search?type=article%2Cproduct&q=Surprise+box.  In my box, there was a dress similar to this one.  As Kaliyana sizing can be quite variable, I couldn't even get it on and it I could have, it would have been dragging on the floor.  As my expectation was that I would not be able to use everything in the box, I was quite happy that 4 pieces fit me and were good colours for me.  Another piece worked for DD.  There is a skirt that I've made a pattern from this morning -- colours not good for me and too small.  Again, it's something that needs a wider fabric or some creative piecing [as illustrated in the current issue of Threads Magazine].  Eventually, the dress will go to a charity shop.

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Garden Girl

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Re: Lagenlook Inspiration & Chat
« Reply #37 on: February 04, 2017, 10:15:14 PM »

I was just looking at the Daniela Gregis SS17 garments and there are some wonderful pieces mixed in with all the goofy props she likes to use.  Here are 2 links to take a peek. NowFashion and NYMag.

I tend to really like some of her knit pieces, which all look knitting machine friendly.

Cindy, I made a dress with two rows of ruffles at the hem. Six inch wide ruffles no less. I was plesantly suprised with how much I liked the look, not for everyday or everywhere, but it is a fun alternative. I would not have wanted ruffles up on my torso.

In answer to your question, deciding what to use, both pattern or fabric, is so personal and specialized I think. The one constant that seems to apply is it's generally natural fibers or a combination thereof. Styles are all over the board. If you're on Pinterest doing a search there, it will yield even more refinement than a Google search for Lagenlook. Then you need to take a look for what aesthetic strikes a chord with you. Modern and sleek, ruffles and vintage, heavy layers with woolens or several layers of mostly sleeveless gossamar like silks and gauzes. Garments just slightly different from mainstream or items that are really out there and are almost costume like. Most people we know tend to get a mix of styles and mix and layer for the effect they want that day.

I'm in a very warm climate so I wear linen even in the depths of Winter, never wools. I like light weight stuff, mostly pants, usually cropped or above ankle, never jeans for years. I've grown fond of unusual vests, vey light & often lace & sheers, as a way to add a layer yet stay cool.

Patterns? They are everywhere, and no where. Lekala, Bootstrap, Tina Givens (all LL), Burda, Vogue, and all the Big 4 have some that work, but not a section geared to this sort of "look". First you need to find some photos you like and then we can point you toward specific patterns if you like.
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FrancesGrimble

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Re: Lagenlook Inspiration & Chat
« Reply #38 on: February 04, 2017, 11:31:37 PM »

IndigoTiger, yes, those Marcy Tilton checked and plaid taffetas are very Krista Larson for her silk clothing. She also does the same styles in simple cotton prints, cotton stripes, eyelets, and plain linens.

Cindy, here’s a stab at a definition of lagenlook.

Often three or more visible layers (that is, not counting underwear).

Loose fit, ranging from a bit loose to oversized, depending on taste. This is generally a total look, not a combination of loose and closely fitted garments.

Natural fibers. Linen and cotton are very popular in warm climates, woolens are very popular in cool climates, and silk is used in both climates for fancier garments.

No specific colors are associated with lagenlook. The tailored look (see below) favors plain fabrics (that is, no prints, stripes, or the like). In addition to plain colors, the frilly look favors traditional-looking cotton prints, eyelets, stripes, checks, and plaids. Woolens are often heathered.

Two main looks:  Tailored and frilly/Edwardianish. The difference between the two can be putting (or not putting) a ruffle (or ruffles) on the same garment. For many examples of the tailored look from different manufacturers, see the eBay store Watersister (aside from some ugly jewelry) and the designer Cynthia Ashby, among others. For the frilly look, among others see the designers Krista Larson, Ivey Abitz, Tina Givens, Sarah Clemens, Magnolia Pearl, and Ewa i Walla. German and Scandinavian lagenlook often has a folkloric air, including scoop-necked peasant vests and multicolored embroidery.

Popular garments include tunics (varying from hip length to almost floor length), loose crop tops (that is somewhere above the waist), loose vests, long skirts and dresses, and wide and balloon pants. The frillier look often features jumpers, and petticoat-skirts and drawer-pants peeking below jumpers, dresses, or tunics. Outerwear includes long loose coats, long sweaters, and although as not often shown with lagenlook I think ponchos are ideal. There is no standard hemline length for any garment.

Especially for the tailored look, details include what I call random piecing (a garment section that doesn’t really have to be cut separately, and which can be a contrasting fabric or not). Also for both the tailored and frilly looks, irregular tucks, uneven hems, and drawstring effects are popular.

Hats:  They are not often shown with American lagenlook, but the Germans like woolly hats, knitted or fabric.

Jewelry:  I’ve never seen much discussion of this, but I think handmade-looking, informal-looking jewelry works best.

Pattern sources:  Vogue, Butterick, McCall’s, Simplicity, Tina Givens (though her sizing is often strange), Tessuti, Folkwear, some Japanese pattern books, and a book titled Bold & Beautiful Easy-Sew Clothes.

Interestingly, lagenlook is not primarily a handmade look. Not only is most of it commercially made, it does not focus much on hand embroidery, hand knitting, fancy dyed effects, stenciling, or any other kind of handmade decoration or handwork, whether the real thing or machine imitation. However, the simple styles lend themselves very well to handwork. Lace trim is not that popular either, even with the frilly/Edwardian look. An exception is Magnolia Pearl.

Although anyone can wear lagenlook, I often feel the target markets are women over 50 and women of any age who are a bit overweight. Some women over 50, including me, like lagenlook for its echoes of the Edwardianish styles of the 1970s and 1980s and its somewhat (or even very) bohemian air.
« Last Edit: February 05, 2017, 03:35:26 AM by FrancesGrimble »
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Elephun

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Re: Lagenlook Inspiration & Chat
« Reply #39 on: February 05, 2017, 02:37:31 AM »

Garden Girl- Daniela Gregis is wonderful! I don't think I'd seen her or her clothes before. I've just pinned many looks to Pinterest. So much of it is wearable and delightful at the same time. Thanks for the tip!
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M lambie

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Re: Lagenlook Inspiration & Chat
« Reply #40 on: February 05, 2017, 04:23:07 AM »

I keep trying to post (for the last 3+ hours) and keep failing... trying again without any links or formatting. Sigh. [ETA: that worked! Edited the links back in afterwards.]

Indigotiger, you are an enabler!  ;D I just made my first purchase from Marcy Tilton... a lovely black/grey striped silk taffeta! I am sooooo excited! :D

https://marcytilton.com/collections/silks-linings/products/ventana-stripe-silk-taffeta-woven

She also has another silk I've been eyeing, but haven't been able to justify buying, this lovely grey plaid - it looks just like (maybe the same?) as a fabric Ivey Abitz used in 2014 holiday. You can see it here:


http://iveyabitz.com/2014holiday/5.php

and

https://marcytilton.com/collections/silks-linings/products/gray-dawn-plaid-silk-taffeta

Frances, I really like those shawls you linked to. Too bad I can't knit and my crochet skills are pretty poor. I think something like that would get a lot of wear in my wardrobe.

CindyHa, I would love to see pix of which styles are speaking to you. :) The two skirts I am wearing in my avatar are both self-drafted. The are both basically a wide a-line shape with elastic waist and a pleated ruffle at the hem. The longer one also has curved tucks above the ruffle. I posted a pic of how I did the tucks on my flickr:


Wine tucked skirt in progress - the tucks by Mary, on Flickr

Most of the looks I like can be adapted from some pretty basic styles (a-line or circle skirt, etc.) Obviously other types of styles have more complex shapes and seaming that would require a lot more drafting effort.

Garden Girl, I like that Ottobre wrap/shawl-cardi you posted! Not sure if it would work on my body, but I'm intrigued. I think auntnina is planning a similar garment for her SWAP.

I think I'd like to try and copy that cute Gudrun Sjoden cardi... It looks pretty simple. Anyone have any ideas for starting points?



Edited repeatedly to put links etc. back into post.
« Last Edit: February 05, 2017, 04:34:02 AM by M lambie »
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indigotiger

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Re: Lagenlook Inspiration & Chat
« Reply #41 on: February 05, 2017, 05:59:40 AM »

Mary, I am really looking forward to seeing more of your new sewing projects... When I saw that Marcy was suggesting that folks wash the new silk taffeta for a more textured informal look I couldn't help but pass the information along here.

While I can knit reasonably well, I have been unable to find any patterns on Ravelry that are similar enough to the Gudrun Sjoden cropped jacket in basic shape. There are plenty of little bolero jackets, but nothing with that particular configuration of wrapped pinned front, IMHO. I have not looked for sewing patterns that are similar, but am actually rather tempted to start playing around with developing my own
 pattern instead, since the schematic from the GS website looks fairly simple
IMHO, what makes it work as a garment is that the knitted fabric is highly flexible and openwork... could be worth a try, once I get a little further forward on my SWAP sewing.
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fzxdoc

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Re: Lagenlook Inspiration & Chat
« Reply #42 on: February 05, 2017, 06:38:10 AM »

Indigotiger, have you looked at the Cocoknits site?  Their knitting patterns focus on top-down, minimally-seamed knitted styles in flowy, asymmetric silhouettes.

I like their Habu styles: http://store.cocoknits.com/search.php?search_query=habu

Here's a link to their main Women's patterns page:  http://store.cocoknits.com/patterns

Kathryn

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Garden Girl

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Re: Lagenlook Inspiration & Chat
« Reply #43 on: February 05, 2017, 09:21:14 AM »

Kathryn, those Cocoknits are fabulous. They are in the same vein as the knits I posted on the machine knitting thread earlier today. I'd never seen these before- whee! The prices for the patterns seem reasonable too. These are the sort of knits I want to be able to make for myself with the KM, in fact, the reason I bought it. When you find these styles in boutiques they tend to be very fairly pricey.

Mary & IndigoTiger
, I thought I could do something similar to the little Gudrun Sjoden crop jacket on my knitting machine. Like Alison says it looks fairly simple and the sleeves are sewn in by the looks of it, rather than fully fashioned. I wouldn't be surprised if it has shoulder seams as well; can't really tell in the photos.

Mary, you're right. That one sweater AuntNina shows looks very similar to the little Ottobre cardi. I had missed that detail. The Otto one has slim cut, extra long sleeves so that you get pooling on the arm. I think it would be a super piece for the "small over big" look and could be fun over a sleeveless dress of some sort. It's cut with a left & right side, seamed down the back with narrow ovals cut to insert the sleeves into & they did everything on the serger & coverstitch machines. It made me want a coverstitch machine.

Elephun, glad to introduce you to Daniela Gregis. You've led me to so many new designers and pattern companies it's nice to be able to show you one. There is quite a bit of whimsy in most of her collections.

I need to get some sewing done! But I'm back at it- This weeks special, a sinus infection! (Maybe I got it from AuntNina after reading she had one.) It wants to be an ear infection and the antibiotics I started Friday afternoon are just barely starting to work their magic. Meanwhile I've had to cancel 2 sewing "dates" at the quilt shop and breathing cold air is pure misery. Bed time now.
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fzxdoc

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Re: Lagenlook Inspiration & Chat
« Reply #44 on: February 05, 2017, 03:01:01 PM »

Rene, Cocoknits is coming out with a new book, too. I think it can be preordered on the site.

Kathryn
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cindyha

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Re: Lagenlook Inspiration & Chat
« Reply #45 on: February 05, 2017, 03:27:03 PM »

M lambie:  I love the skirt you are wearing, thanks for the pictures of how you drafted them.  My technical sewing skills are good enough, but my drafting and fitting skills stink.  I'll have to play around and see if I can duplicate what you've done. 

Also, it seems like it's simple for everyone else, but just putting an entire outfit together is not intuitive.  I want to find clothes that will layer over each other and mix and match.  I think I need to start with an entire outfit to duplicate.

I can find ready to wear tops with sleeves that fit me, but just about every sewing pattern I've tried for a top ends up with the sleeves being too tight, or I can't lift my arms w/o it restricting movement and being too tight across the shoulder area.  I've tried overlaying a ready to wear over a printed sewing pattern and re-drafting, but somehow it still ends up a bit wonky.

I've resorted to only sewing sleeveless garments.  :-(  I have tried tons of different fitting methods for widening sleeves, FBA, sloping shoulders, narrow shoulders, etc.

I like Bryn Walker's styles as a start:  I hope you can see this pinterest board.  https://www.pinterest.com/cindyh2012/my-style/
It has images of the Bryn Walker Noa tunic and Zena tunic.
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Sizun

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Re: Lagenlook Inspiration & Chat
« Reply #46 on: February 05, 2017, 03:36:37 PM »

Kathryn, thank you so much for the links to CocoKnits ! I got a great idea to use up some 25 year old leftover yarn I found at my parents' home last summer. I'm a bit tired of making very classic things lately (even DH noticed  ;) ) I might use a Coco Knits pattern for my SWAP second cardigan.
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Re: Lagenlook Inspiration & Chat
« Reply #47 on: February 05, 2017, 05:51:45 PM »

Great, Sizun. In fact that first sweater made on your knitting machine (the gorgeous one with the cowl/hood) looked a lot like a Cocoknits type of design to me. Because Cocoknits patterns usually don't have seams, you'll have to adapt them for machine knitting, if that's your plan.

Kathryn
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Elephun

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Re: Lagenlook Inspiration & Chat
« Reply #48 on: February 05, 2017, 06:33:09 PM »

Cindyha- I think if you like a Bryn Walker style, people on the board could give you some tips to help you put together an outfit.  Also, people can help with fitting issues. Not on the same thread, though  ;)

The outfits on the website http://www.brynwalker.com don't look overly complicated to coordinate as long as one sticks with a color family. What I mean is that each outfit as shown seems to be two or three pieces and the pieces are meant to coordinate.
Tunic over dress. Tunic over dress over pants. Dress over pants. Tunic over pants. Cardigan over dress. Wrap over dress. Dress over leggings. Shirt and pants. Etc. Each piece is a bit voluminous so an outfit may look, at first glance, to be made of more pieces than it really is.
I am on my phone so I didn't carefully analyze the styles or style names, but it struck me that there were not too many different individual styles, but they for the most part mix and match well with each other. I briefly looked for line drawings, but didn't see any.

 
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Garden Girl

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Re: Lagenlook Inspiration & Chat
« Reply #49 on: February 05, 2017, 06:48:58 PM »

M lambie:  I love the skirt you are wearing, thanks for the pictures of how you drafted them.  My technical sewing skills are good enough, but my drafting and fitting skills stink.  I'll have to play around and see if I can duplicate what you've done. 

Also, it seems like it's simple for everyone else, but just putting an entire outfit together is not intuitive.  I want to find clothes that will layer over each other and mix and match.  I think I need to start with an entire outfit to duplicate.

I can find ready to wear tops with sleeves that fit me, but just about every sewing pattern I've tried for a top ends up with the sleeves being too tight, or I can't lift my arms w/o it restricting movement and being too tight across the shoulder area.  I've tried overlaying a ready to wear over a printed sewing pattern and re-drafting, but somehow it still ends up a bit wonky.

I've resorted to only sewing sleeveless garments.  :-(  I have tried tons of different fitting methods for widening sleeves, FBA, sloping shoulders, narrow shoulders, etc.

I like Bryn Walker's styles as a start:  I hope you can see this pinterest board.  https://www.pinterest.com/cindyh2012/my-style/
It has images of the Bryn Walker Noa tunic and Zena tunic.

OK. Cindy, we're talking illusion or perception here; it doesn't start out easy. It takes time to learn something new and I think putting together pleasing groups of garments in a new to you style is a skill that has to be developed. There is a lot of trial & error on the way to simple & intuitive.  ;) I think everyone else here has been playing at this for several years. Two years ago I did a monthly Lagenlook sewalong here, mostly with a different garment type or sometimes a particular designer and we used that to help build more of a wardrobe.

Here's your Noa tunic, in linen. I don't have a pattern suggestion per se, as I don't care for cap sleeves like this on me so I don't pay attention to the patterns with this feature. But as a suggestion, if you do something similar, make the cowl separate so the piece is more versatile. Then, so the colors will match, always wash the cowl & tunic together even if you didn't wear the cowl. You want them to fade the same.  :) Or not, if you like a more varied look.

On the tight sleeve/tight across the shoulders bit, is it strictly that your arms are larger than they allow for or is it tight across the back, like not enough width on the bodice back. You mention narrow shoulders too. On the patterns you've been using have you been selecting your size by the method that company suggests? Some say full bust, some say to use the high bust. Several of the Big 4 companies tell you, in the catalog but not on the pattern, to choose based on high bust. Also, if you happen to be plus sizes, Connie Crawford does garments for Butterick with the assumption of a much fuller bicep. Also, have you tried just cutting a multisize pattern with a larger sleeve and armscye? For example, a size 12 for the bodice and a 14 or 16 for the sleeve and arm. I've heard of that working for some people. I've not had to address this myself.

There were threads for fitting help. I'm not sure if they are back or not or where they are right now. Take a look around, maybe in machine sewing or also under the patterns section? Lots of people who would never look at this thread will go there to assist you. These are universal problems. Also, in patterns you can start a thread, post a picture, and ask for help finding a pattern to emulate a particular garment.

Which brings up the question: do we need a Lagenlook pattern thread?

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SharonGayle

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Re: Lagenlook Inspiration & Chat
« Reply #50 on: February 05, 2017, 07:37:10 PM »

M lambie:  You look so much like my daughter, and you both have the same style aesthetic.  I've been wanting to sew for her so I showed her some of your postings, and she went nuts.  Thanks for the inspiration! We are both looking forward to seeing more of your posts.

cindyha:  two additional fitting considerations for upper sleeves that pull: (1) IF you are petite (which has to do with height, not width)--when we "petite" patterns, we are instructed to fold out a bit of length at the waist, but we are not told that we also need to fold out a bit across the upper chest.  If the bottom of the armscye hangs too low on your body, the upper sleeves will pull in a way such that they feel too tight.  I solved the problem on my frame by folding a 1/2 inch of length out of the upper bodice (front and back) just above the bust area.  (Don't forget to fold a 1/2 inch out of the sleeve length on the same horizontal).    (2) IF you have forward-thrust shoulders, they will cause pulling across the back and upper arms. A FTS adjustment may be needed. 

The others possible "tight upper arms" issues have been eloquently covered in the above posts.  Keep in mind that you may need more than one adjustment.  You should see my patterns after I adjust for narrow, square, forward-thrust shoulders, and a petite length (plus a FBA).  LOL!  But I have it down now, so the (multiple) adjustments are quick, and my sleeves no longer pull.  I had all of this figured out years ago except the petite length across the upper chest/back/sleeve--for me, that adjustment has made the most difference of all.
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FrancesGrimble

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Re: Lagenlook Inspiration & Chat
« Reply #51 on: February 05, 2017, 07:54:38 PM »

When I have the "upper bodice too long" problem, I take up the shoulder seams from the shoulder tapering into the neck. Works for me. Note, on me armholes are never too small.

I buy by full bust size; but if a lagenlook pattern or garment looks very oversized, I go a whole size smaller.

Cindy, just look at online pictures from the manufacturers and stores that have the clothing you like and you'll get the hang of coordinating outfits. I never read fashion magazines or look at pictures of runway shows. They have nothing to do with reality. A catalog is a better guide.
« Last Edit: February 05, 2017, 08:35:09 PM by FrancesGrimble »
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cindyha

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Re: Lagenlook Inspiration & Chat
« Reply #52 on: February 05, 2017, 11:05:34 PM »

Thanks all.

The arm fitting issues I have are twofold I believe:
1.  My biceps/upper arms must be larger than your average bear's.
2.  The armholes on commercial patterns tend to run big and ironically if the armhole is too big it restricts movement.

Still baffles me why I don't run into this issue nearly as often with RTW. 

I'll keep plugging away!

Cindy
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Elephun

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Re: Lagenlook Inspiration & Chat
« Reply #53 on: February 06, 2017, 04:27:13 AM »

Cindyha-
Perhaps something in this post or on this thread will help you find a solution for your arm fitting issues.
      post: http://artisanssquare.com/sg/index.php?topic=114.msg1475#msg1475
      full thread: http://artisanssquare.com/sg/index.php?topic=114.msg546#msg546
It sounds like you are doing okay plugging away, but if you want to get some help with fitting a particular pattern, you might want to check out the currently empty Critiques board, for some fitting help: http://artisanssquare.com/sg/index.php?board=15.0
I can't get into Stitcher's Guild Classic, otherwise I would link you to the older Critiques board so that you could see an example.
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Elephun

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Re: Lagenlook Inspiration & Chat
« Reply #54 on: February 06, 2017, 07:37:19 AM »

Cutting Line Designs Snap To It or Cutting Line Designs The Blouse Perfected might be suitable for adapting into the something along the lines of the Zena Tunic.


Cutting Line Designs Light and Shadow or The Sewing Workshop Alex and Olive might be suitable for adapting into the something along the lines of the Noa Tunic.







« Last Edit: February 06, 2017, 07:48:59 AM by Elephun »
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Sizun

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Re: Lagenlook Inspiration & Chat
« Reply #55 on: February 06, 2017, 07:51:00 AM »

Great, Sizun. In fact that first sweater made on your knitting machine (the gorgeous one with the cowl/hood) looked a lot like a Cocoknits type of design to me. Because Cocoknits patterns usually don't have seams, you'll have to adapt them for machine knitting, if that's your plan.

Kathryn

Indeed, I actually realized I have the Liesl tunic in my Lagenlook Favorites on Ravelry.
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Garden Girl

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Re: Lagenlook Inspiration & Chat
« Reply #56 on: February 07, 2017, 01:24:20 AM »

Great, Sizun. In fact that first sweater made on your knitting machine (the gorgeous one with the cowl/hood) looked a lot like a Cocoknits type of design to me. Because Cocoknits patterns usually don't have seams, you'll have to adapt them for machine knitting, if that's your plan.

Kathryn

Indeed, I actually realized I have the Liesl tunic in my Lagenlook Favorites on Ravelry.

...and upon reading this last night I went immediately to Ravelry and looked up your Lagenlook patterns and added several to my favorites. I also saw I had messages and that I had been added as a friend by several people, including you. I need to go there more...I learn most of what I know by going to see what groups other people belong to.
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Sizun

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Re: Lagenlook Inspiration & Chat
« Reply #57 on: February 07, 2017, 08:34:30 AM »

...and upon reading this last night I went immediately to Ravelry and looked up your Lagenlook patterns and added several to my favorites. I also saw I had messages and that I had been added as a friend by several people, including you. I need to go there more...I learn most of what I know by going to see what groups other people belong to.

I'm surprised there is no lagenlook group on Ravelry. Some people do tag their projects with Lagenlook, but not many. However, if you search for positive ease patterns, you find a lot of lagenlook style. Something I like to do is to click on friends activity. Lots of pointers to new ideas there. But beware : it's time consuming  ;D
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Sizun

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Re: Lagenlook Inspiration & Chat
« Reply #58 on: February 07, 2017, 08:42:35 AM »

Cindyha, the Noa tunic has been on my to-do list for a long time now (since last summer actually). May be we could organise a tiny sew-along, or not so tiny if other members want to join ? Not right now though because I'm working on the SWAP project and it's still winter cold were I live (eastern north France). But I decluttered DS' bedroom lately and I have lots of old sheets to muslin  ;D
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cindyha

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Re: Lagenlook Inspiration & Chat
« Reply #59 on: February 07, 2017, 02:59:58 PM »

Thanks Sizun.   That would be fun. 

Cindy
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Rivergum

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Re: Lagenlook Inspiration & Chat
« Reply #60 on: February 07, 2017, 08:36:51 PM »

Very glad to see this site is back up, many thanks to the person(s) who made it happen.

I think the Kayla Kennington tunic at Vogue is pretty close to the NOA tunic, if you look at the line drawings, except you have to add the cowl. I saw a pic of the NOA online where the model is holding up the sides and it shows the shape quite clearly.

https://voguepatterns.mccall.com/v9188

There is a sale on right now for the next couple of days.
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FrancesGrimble

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Re: Lagenlook Inspiration & Chat
« Reply #61 on: February 08, 2017, 01:01:11 AM »

I have a couple of sleeveless Noa tunics. I love cowl necklines! The cut is rather like View C in this pattern:

https://voguepatterns.mccall.com/v8976

but with no waist seam. The piecing seam near the bottom is only on the left side of the tunic (as it is worn) and is straight, not curved. The left hem bag, for want of a better term, is about a foot bigger than the right hem bag, even though the left side seam is only 1 1/2 inches longer than the right. In other words, the tunic is asymmetrical in length, but most of the extra on the left side is added as width.

When I was digging a Noa out of my closet, the first tunic I took out was a Fenini, which does look like a sleeveless Vogue V9188 with a cowl. So here's another maker with some lagenlook:

http://fenini.com/

« Last Edit: February 08, 2017, 01:16:02 AM by FrancesGrimble »
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M lambie

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Re: Lagenlook Inspiration & Chat
« Reply #62 on: February 08, 2017, 02:49:06 AM »

Rivergum, it's great to see you back! :)

CindyHa, the Noa tunic is very cool. I like the shape and seaming of the skirt portion... I may try to copy/adapt this look (with a different bodice). Frances, thanks for the great insight on the construction, very helpful.

It looks pretty easy to draft and sew (except for the cowl, I have no idea how to draft a cowl LOL). A sewalong could be fun! (Post SWAP, as everyone says.)

And wow, Kathryn, I love those Cocoknits styles! As soon as I saw them, they reminded me of Sizun, too. Thanks so much for sharing the link. Too bad I don't knit - looks like I will need to learn LOL.

SharonGayle, thanks so much for your nice comments! :) I would love to see what you might sew for your daughter.

Indigotiger, I am so glad you told me about those fabrics... both the ones I liked are now sold out! Luckily I purchased my lovely precious stripe. :D

Now I'm thinking of combining the shape of that cute Gudrun Sjoden cardi with pieced/patchwork jersey, like this one made by Nancy Murakami. Or something similar. I don't know.  ::) It could be awesome, or maybe stupid. ;) I do have a lot of scraps left from my Alabama Chanin scrap bag.


http://stitchtalk.com/2015/03/hand-made-by-expo-fashionistas/#sthash.u9eoyQCB.dpbs
« Last Edit: February 08, 2017, 02:50:46 AM by M lambie »
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FrancesGrimble

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Re: Lagenlook Inspiration & Chat
« Reply #63 on: February 08, 2017, 03:31:34 AM »

You can just find a pattern with the depth of neckline and cowl you want, trace the (probably lower) neckline onto the main pattern you will use, and use the same cowl pattern piece.
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Rivergum

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Re: Lagenlook Inspiration & Chat
« Reply #64 on: February 08, 2017, 03:59:54 AM »

Thanks MLambie, it's nice to be back. I haven't been sewing much for myself lately, mainly for the grands, but my interest is coming back.

Thanks for the pointers re the NOA tunic, Frances. I confess I have tried to copy it over Christmas and it was a flop. I then recut it and now really like it, but I still don't have a NOA.

The problem was that the tunic looked much like the pic below, which is a real NOA tunic on a real person. Flat at front and back centre with couple of extraneous tacked on bits at the sides.




I think it could be a size issue, i.e. what should be voluminous folds is taken up by extra girth of wearer. When I recut the linen into a TFT tunic I made sure to add volume at CF and CB. Looks much better now.

Re the cowl, it is just a rectangle sewn into a tube, folded double or not, and sewn onto the neck opening. I find cowls with a circumference of 80cm look good on me, although I have had 90cm too looking good. Any more and it slips off my shoulders. The neck edge needs to be the same length as the cowl. The stiffer the fabric the bigger and wider the cowl can be. My last merino jumper had a cowl of 80cm and as the jersey is quite drapey I wouldn't have wanted it any bigger. Length of cowl is 40-50cm, folded double before sewing to neck edge, then folded again or left to collapse into itself. Stiff fabric looks better than drapey with big cowls. Drapey cowls can look limp and you feel you want to rearrange them constantly.

Some of the noa tunics have conical cowls, narrower at the neck edge than lower down, and single layer. Not the one pictured here though. Maybe Frances' version has that type of cowl? I haven't tried this but the pattern piece would be something like a parallelogram I imagine? Frances, if one of your tunics is like that, can you comment?



« Last Edit: February 08, 2017, 04:07:43 AM by Rivergum »
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FrancesGrimble

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Re: Lagenlook Inspiration & Chat
« Reply #65 on: February 08, 2017, 04:17:14 AM »

The cowl is single layer, sort of conical, about 10 inches wider at the top than the bottom, about 11 inches deep at the center back seam with concave curve, about 15 inches deep at the center front with convex curve, narrow foldover hem.

One feature of the Noa I suggest not to copy is the little cap sleeve effect at the armhole, which at least on me comes down onto the upper arm and binds. I need to alter that for a better sleeveless garment.

I think the lady in the photo has the same style tunic I have. But you see her in a side view, so the asymmetry is not visible, and I think she is wearing a slip or something underneath that is pushing out the hem of her tunic a bit. I think the cowl is the same. It can be arranged in a variety of ways.

But wait. Bryn Walker runs large. Their smallest size is loose on me. I am noticing her cap sleeves look significantly farther down on the arm than mine. She is wearing a larger size and it is possible that the proportions differ between sizes.
« Last Edit: February 08, 2017, 04:25:31 AM by FrancesGrimble »
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Re: Lagenlook Inspiration & Chat
« Reply #66 on: February 08, 2017, 05:41:07 AM »

Thanks Frances. The bit about the concave curve at the back seam of the cowl is interesting, I would not have guessed.
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Re: Lagenlook Inspiration & Chat
« Reply #67 on: February 08, 2017, 07:16:24 AM »

Frances, thank you for the details about the Noa Tunic. Both suggested patterns have set in sleeves whereas the original from Bryn Walker has cap sleeves in a kimono style. My plan was to draw a schematic from the pictures I collected on Pinterest and my own measurements, and all the information you provided is a great help.

 (I don't know how to express it : it seems "cap sleeve" is used both for a set in style and a kimono stub style ?)
EDIT : Vogue says "extended shoulders and cap sleeves". See V8968

M Lambie, this pieced cardigan is an awesome idea to use up scraps, although demanding a lot of careful work ! I'm drawn to pieced garments and I collect lots of pics on my Pinterest boards as well as leftover bits and ends but any attempt at it was always a wadder.
« Last Edit: February 08, 2017, 12:01:48 PM by Sizun »
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Re: Lagenlook Inspiration & Chat
« Reply #68 on: February 08, 2017, 02:53:22 PM »

Somewhere I have a cardigan that I started refashioning from a man's extra large pullover sweater that, if I'm remembering correctly, resembles the Gudrun Sjödén sweater  that Frances shared with us.  The sweater was a natural color cotton with texturing a bit similar to the GS one.  I cut it shorter and up the center, sloping the neckline.  I also cut the cuffs off.  I went over all the raw edges with zig zag.  I would serge now if I were doing it over again, but I didn't have a serger when I was working on it.  Then I sewed on some binding strips of fabric that I made from small pieces of silks and rayons in golds and browns.  This is the part where my memory gets hazy as I'm not sure how far I got towards finished.  I'm not sure why I sat it aside either.  I may have run into some sort of issue with it.  I really need to find it and finish it for spring.  Anyway, I thought this might give someone an idea for making the sweater by refashioning.
« Last Edit: February 08, 2017, 02:56:07 PM by crazyquilter »
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FrancesGrimble

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Re: Lagenlook Inspiration & Chat
« Reply #69 on: February 08, 2017, 09:21:41 PM »

A few days ago, I went through my sweaters to see if there was one I wanted to repurpose for the Gudrun Sjoden wrap cardigan. I discovered that (a) I like all my sweaters too much to cut any of them up but (b) I think most commercial sweaters would not work for that anyway.  The grain of the knit on the wrap sweater makes the cut of the sleeves very clear. The sleeves are unshaped rectangles and there is no armhole, just a straight seam fairly far down. It is possible that there are no shoulder seams either.
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