Author Topic: Interfacing for Shirts & Collars - Favorites?  (Read 5598 times)

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Offline mom2five

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Interfacing for Shirts & Collars - Favorites?
« on: January 21, 2009, 05:40:16 PM »
Does anyone know where I can get some GOOD fusible interfacing for a mans shirt (cuffs and collar)?  The junk that I bought at the "J" store (which is their best!) is making me crazy.  I'm sure they would have exactly what I needed if I was looking for a nice garden ornament or maybe a coloring book.  Maybe I'll just use some of their many yards of fusible web and appliqué a nice frog on the back of my husbands dress shirt so then no one will notice the collar and cuffs.

I'm not against ordering online but I'm afraid to without a recommendation because I don't want to end up with the same stuff I have. 

Sorry for the rant... I'm really frustrated.

angel

Offline Liana

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Re: interfacing for a mans shirt
« Reply #1 on: January 21, 2009, 05:47:45 PM »
I've had good luck with Pam Erny's interfacings from Sew Exciting Fashion Sewing Supply.  NAYY, but she's a custom shirtmaker who designed her own interfacings.  I've made a lot of shirts for my DH, and before I used her ProWoven Fusible, I had good luck using Pellon's ShirTailor.  I always interface both the upper and under collar and stands, and the outside of the cuffs.  I use self-fabric to interface the placket, and if I want a little on the pocket hems, I use a softer fusible there.

You'll have to scroll down to find the different interfacings on the Sew Exciting site, and she has a sample pack available too.  She'll also answer questions.  :)

Offline Karla

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Re: interfacing for a mans shirt
« Reply #2 on: January 21, 2009, 06:07:49 PM »
Sew Exciting interfacing is great, I agree.  Another source of reliable interfacings is Palmer-Pletsch.  http://www.palmerpletsch.com/pfuse.htm

Offline Doris W. in TN

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Re: interfacing for a mans shirt
« Reply #3 on: January 21, 2009, 06:51:16 PM »
Another option is to use a layer of the shirt fabric, if it's a solid color, as a sewn-in type.   I believe that is what David Page Coffin says in his book and video. It also removes all chance of the dreaded bubbling.

FWIW,  last year I dissected one of my DH's Brooks Brothers dress shirts and there is no interfacing in collar.  I didn't get around to the cuff but I'll bet there's no "interfacing", as such,  in them either.

Offline mom2five

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Re: interfacing for a mans shirt
« Reply #4 on: January 21, 2009, 11:30:15 PM »
Thank you for your suggestions... y'all may have saved my sanity! :)

Offline sophie

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Favorite interfacing for shirt collars?
« Reply #5 on: August 03, 2009, 10:10:20 PM »
Hi, I've been sewing knits so much in the past couple years, I'm out-of-touch with using wovens. I have several shirt projects lined up in which I am using good cotton shirtings. I want a good result of course and sort of dread choosing the wrong interfacing. Does anyone have an interfacing they like for collar and collarband that has proven to be bubble-free and not boardy? Thanks for any input. I lean toward woven interfacing but am open to non-woven if there's a good one out there. TIA

Offline sdBev

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Re: Favorite interfacing for shirt collars?
« Reply #6 on: August 04, 2009, 05:32:28 AM »
Sophie

I see all kinds of views, but no replies.  Maybe everyone else is like me.  I don't make really classic button down shirts.  I'm more of a camp-shirt type person.  So I'm happy using tricot fusible knit interfacing, even with my woven fabrics.  I do have a selection of light, medium and heavy knit-interfacing, because I do notice that some fabrics will end up really boardy unless I choose a lighter interfacing. 

OK, some of the real experts should be by in a few minutes and give you good advice and links for excellent shirt interfacings, but that's what I do. 

Offline DebbieY

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Re: Favorite interfacing for shirt collars?
« Reply #7 on: August 04, 2009, 06:05:07 AM »
I use a lightweight fusible stretch for most things that require interfacing as the clothes I make (when I do) are casual and don't require the crisp sharp edges that you are probably after, but I don't think that helps answer your question, sorry.

Offline Lisa

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Re: Favorite interfacing for shirt collars?
« Reply #8 on: August 04, 2009, 06:09:08 AM »
Hi Sophie!

Check out "Liana's Shirt-Making Info," which includes info on interfacing. 

HTH, :)

Lisa
Found: a favorite silver bracelet that I hadn't seen for a while.  On its four quarters it says "Welcome Introspection; Accept Wisdom; Seek Illumination; Embrace Innocence."   It's like a "magic 8-ball" on the wrist...

Offline Katherine

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Re: Favorite interfacing for shirt collars?
« Reply #9 on: August 04, 2009, 12:41:41 PM »
I use muslin, cotton batiste or silk organza, depending on the weight of the shirting. 

This is one case where it doesn't take any longer to use a sew-in interfacing than a fusible.  You can tell what the results are going to be without making a sample just by holding the fabrics together.

Katherine

Offline Liana

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Re: Interfacing for Shirts & Collars - Favorites?
« Reply #10 on: August 04, 2009, 07:03:22 PM »
I just merged these topics, and I think there's good info throughout. 

I still prefer fusible interfacing in the collar and cuffs of a man's shirt, and self fabric for the placket.  For my own clothing, if it's a menswear shirt, I might do the same, but for a softer, or a more casual look, I will use a much lighter interfacing, but probably still a fusible unless it's something like chiffon.  Then, I would test organza first and move on if that didn't suit me.  It all depends on the fabric, and I'm much more likely to use a lighter fabric than I use for DH's shirts. 

HTH!  :)

Offline sophie

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Re: Interfacing for Shirts & Collars - Favorites?
« Reply #11 on: August 04, 2009, 10:19:55 PM »
Everyone's input is so helpful, thank you!! I'm going to test a few things, and thanks for steering me away from anything too mens-wear stiff. The organza might be perfect for one project I have in mind. Just talked to a friend who reminded me it's the pellon paper stuff that tends to bubble.

Liana, your shirts are so gorgeous. Thanks for posting those photos (in the link).

Offline Liana

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Re: Interfacing for Shirts & Collars - Favorites?
« Reply #12 on: August 05, 2009, 01:28:20 AM »
Thanks, Sophie!  Be sure to let us know how your project turns out, and what you decide to use.  :)

Offline Greg

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Re: Interfacing for Shirts & Collars - Favorites?
« Reply #13 on: August 05, 2009, 06:05:33 PM »
I've been making men's shirts for years, and the rule I follow is, if you are going to wash it, don't use fusible interfacing.

I"ve tried every brand, different iron settings, steam, no steam, teflon plates, an iron with no steam holes, everything. Inevitably, once it goes into the wash, it's ruined.

But so what? Professional shirtmakers don't use fusibles either. Muslin or self interfacing works just fine.

Offline stashpanache

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Re: Interfacing for Shirts & Collars - Favorites?
« Reply #14 on: August 05, 2009, 10:01:22 PM »
I have not tried Pam Erny's interfacing but so far, have not liked one fusible I have tried.  I was taught in the beginning (decades ago) to stay away from fusibles but of course, with all these new products out, had to try.  I still don't like them. ;D
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