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SWAP 2020 general discussion thread

Started by Lisanne, October 30, 2019, 05:35:57 am

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kushami

Quote from: Lisanne on November 12, 2019, 02:35:18 amKushami : can you look at a RTW garment and add your own rivets where they have them ?  :thumbsup:

Good idea. I will do some snooping!
Sarah from Australia

treefrog

Quote from: stephaniecan on November 11, 2019, 09:47:48 pmTreefrog: I want to hear more about the woodworkers jacket! The type of utilitarian jacket I am imagining is probably my favourite type of garment. 
I was shown a video of a woodturning tutorial and asked ' can you make that jacket' with this, that and the other modifications.  I started with a pattern for 1/2 zip polar fleece jacket, but made in a tight weave cotton, and lengthened the hem to finger-tip length, shortened the sleeves to elbow length. pencil pocket on the left sleeve. added a soft knit collar with velcro tabs so it can be snugged up around the neck and stop the wood shavings getting inside. Fairly slim lined and with nothing that can get caught in the equipment.

I'm on version 2 at the moment.  Gone for a full length zip, gusset in the back, minor refinements to the collar.  Oh, and now three pencil pockets - each of differing length for short or long pencils  ::) . I'm still procrastinating on sewing on the velcro.

@indigotiger Loved reading your post on your top.  It's looking fantastic, especially with the stripey knit couched into the design. 

Quote from: warpjr1965 on November 12, 2019, 04:10:36 pm@treefrog I'm planning on this: https://mccallpattern.mccall.com/m7694

I don't love the pleat in the back, but I do like the shaped bottom band. I'll have to muslin it to see how it fits.

Love the pattern.  It will look great.


Turquoise

@treefrog Love the idea of customised pencil pockets for different length pencils  ;D

Lisanne

Wow Indigotiger - another amazing piece combining vision and skill  :heart:
Does this bring you joy, calm, confidence  :D  if not, try something else.

https://sewingplums.com - comments on wardrobes, patterns, style, fit
https://uk.pinterest.com/sewingplums/ - style images
https://aimforquality.wordpress.com - good basic sewing techniques
https://easyjackets.wordpress.com - no need for tailoring, unless you want to
https://helpwithsewingpatterninstructions.wordpress.com/2017/03/01/first-blog-post/ - Peggy Sagers sew-alongs

sewordinary

@treefrog Lovely illustrations of your plans. It makes it easy to visualise how the items will co-ordinate.

stephaniecan

Thanks for the description of the woodworker's jacket, treefrog. It sounds great! I love the pencil pocket details. Those little touches really make a garment speical. I wonder if you have sewn on the velcro yet? :)

Turquoise

Well done @warpjr1965 for cutting out turtleneck ready for SWAP and I'm looking forward to seeing the pink moto jacket in progress.  I'm hoping to have a bit more time for sewing again this week and am going to try and get some muslins for SWAP started.

Scottiesews

After some considerable absence I "think" I may be able to find time to at least start SWAP this year.  I had to bow out of 2018's SWAP as I struggled with the pressure from hubby's side effects from chemo.  By May 2018 he had battled through a years worth of chemo for lung cancer & chronic Lymphoid Leukemia & was declared to be in remission.  However by October 2018 the lung cancer had returned with a vengeance, but now on Immunotherapy the tumours have shrunk & there are few side effects.  It will not cure him but give him the opportunity to make the most of the time he has left which could be a few years yet!  Of course he had to develop a skin cancer, now removed, & there has been a spread into his bones but he's gone back to allotment gardening so fitter than he's been for some time.  Anyhow he's retired on health grounds so I partially retired too & the theory is I get more time to sew.  Along with new hobbies of weaving & I just bought a spinning wheel, my thoughts are to incorporate some self woven fabric into my wardrobe.  My head is quite literally spinning with ideas at the flexible rules this year.  Heres hoping I get further than previous years   :))

warpjr1965

Oh gosh Scottiesews, what a year! Sounds like DH is doing well enough, I hope he remains fit!

I am glad you are joining, and am really excited to see your weaving, if you manage it. I would love to learn, but really have not got the time right now.
Wendy

Morzel

@Scottiesews I wish your husband all the best! Good to see you again- I am looking forward to your SWAP start. What's on your loom right now?

@warpjr1965 yes, do sew up that moto jacket, as the pattern (and the colour for it) sounds great, even if it does not fit into the colour scheme. Which, by the way, sounds very fashionable.

@MsSindy those fabrics look beautiful! I can't wear orange, but seeing your orange wool makes me want some myself... How come you think the red/black print does not look good with the tan wool? I think it looks good together in one of the photos. I'd wear it (IF I were to wear orange... :D ) Tackling the pants pattern right away seems smart.

@treefrog as for being short of fabric, nothing left for back pockets - could't you use some different fabric for back welt pockets? (You could use black satin fabric for the welts and red pocket fabric for a bit of tail feather...  ;D )

@kushami your choices of jacket patterns and considering length - one has a bit of parka styling. (If you use a flowy fabric) You could use a long length for both pencil and full skirts. Like so:


I am thinking about a smart parka style jacket/coat myself - the Kelly by Sewaholic. We'll see.
Eva

Scottiesews

@Morzel The last item on the loom was a scarf. Had to put it away while I decorate a bedroom & I simply can't find anymore time! I do have a hoodie type top cut out but quite when I'll get to it, I have no idea.

Morzel

@Scottiesews when the stuff is out one always gets more done- as soon as you pack it away, there is more work involved than just sitting down to weave a few strands... so one doesn't start with a small time frame... Interested to have a peep of that scarf!
Eva

treefrog

Quote from: sewordinary on November 15, 2019, 08:40:41 pm@treefrog Lovely illustrations of your plans. It makes it easy to visualise how the items will co-ordinate.
@sewordinary
Thank-you.  I find it helpful to see how the proportions work and which combinations may not work.  I need to give a bit more thought to the pants.

Quote from: stephaniecan on November 17, 2019, 10:03:24 amI wonder if you have sewn on the velcro yet? :)
@stephaniecan  Umm, no  :embarassed:  Still procrastinating  ;D   Should really finish it as he made me a really nice lidded container for my pins.  It has a nice dish shape inside that makes it easy to pick up individual pins.

Quote from: Scottiesews on November 17, 2019, 03:19:33 pmAlong with new hobbies of weaving & I just bought a spinning wheel, my thoughts are to incorporate some self woven fabric into my wardrobe. 
@Scottiesews  How exciting.  I'd love to hear more about your plans.  What type of loom do you have?

Quote from: Morzel on November 18, 2019, 12:20:26 am@treefrog as for being short of fabric, nothing left for back pockets - could't you use some different fabric for back welt pockets? (You could use black satin fabric for the welts and red pocket fabric for a bit of tail feather...  ;D )
@Morzel :applause2: Good one!  I like your thinking.
Your parka sounds like a great idea. 

@warpjr1965  Your new colour scheme soulds lively.  I like blue with mustard.  Hope you still get a chance to sew the moto jacket.  It looks like a great design.

@Noum  Your plans sound very intriguing.  I've only briefly looked at the Kibbe system so I'm very intersted in your approach.  Love the idea of lost of seaming.

CCL

We've been ill at Chez CCL, so I haven't been able to comment much, but Treefrog, your photo of the welt pocket with flap! Magnificent! I just had to stop in and remark.  Really superb!

I haven't done one of those in years...and even then, on a soft wool twead that could hide multiple sins.  Once again, Bravo! 

There are so many inspiring ideas, fabrics and other goodies going on in SWAP land, so I want to come back later and comment once things get a little less hectic and we are back to health.

Oh, and I am still contemplating posting a sew-along but slow sewing plan...only I am still culling out ideas I threw in to make the plan fit the rules (which are great) in order to better focus on garments I am really eager to make.

In the meantime, I need to get BH's vest made for Christmas in the limited sewing time I seem to have available.


Turquoise

Best wishes for a speedy recovery @CCL

sewsy

CCL, hope you and BH will be feeling better soon. I'm still in ruminatin' mode, pulled out two woven wools for the boyfriend jacket idea; one a dark cobalt blue (the wrong side is navy, which would be more to my liking) and a black. Although I don't really want to do a black jacket, I'm leaning more and more towards it.

what may wind up happening is that I do two. One in black wool and one in a beige tweed (one of my first wool purchases) that I got from JoAnns a looooong time ago. It's a tweed wool/silk blend, and I got it back then thinking that it'd make a great jacket. Still do. It'll be fun to finally sew it up.

CCL

Thank you, all.  BH is on a series of antibiotics and Prednisone and I just finished mine..so we are definitely on the mend and my focus can return to figuring out how best to take advantage of the SWAP rules and create a workable plan I will enjoy sewing to throughout the year.

May I rely on everyone's experience or suggestions on a simple pattern for a silk camisole?  I have never made undergarments for myself.

warpjr1965

CCL I hope you feel better soon, and BH as well!

I have not made camis or under garments, but the Ogden cami is a very popular pattern these days. A sewing friend of mine loves this pattern, and she doesn't pull punches when it comes to pattern critique. :)

here's her post on the cami https://dressmakingdebacles.blogspot.com/2018/05/true-bias-ogden-cami.html

and here is the link to the pattern website: https://shop.truebias.com/product/ogden-cami
Wendy

Lisanne

Quote from: CCL on November 23, 2019, 06:42:00 amsuggestions on a simple pattern for a silk camisole?
Are you looking for one with bias bound edges ?  This one has a neck-armhole facing, no bust dart, and comes with a photo sew-along
https://sewoverit.co.uk/product/silk-cami-pdf-sewing-pattern/
Does this bring you joy, calm, confidence  :D  if not, try something else.

https://sewingplums.com - comments on wardrobes, patterns, style, fit
https://uk.pinterest.com/sewingplums/ - style images
https://aimforquality.wordpress.com - good basic sewing techniques
https://easyjackets.wordpress.com - no need for tailoring, unless you want to
https://helpwithsewingpatterninstructions.wordpress.com/2017/03/01/first-blog-post/ - Peggy Sagers sew-alongs

treefrog

Quote from: CCL on November 23, 2019, 06:42:00 amMay I rely on everyone's experience or suggestions on a simple pattern for a silk camisole?  I have never made undergarments for myself.
Hope you are both feeling better very soon.

I'm also planning a silk cami, possible with a lace insert.  I had been looking at the Ogden as I like the neckline.  I'm not sure if it is cut on the bias or not.  Another option is the Kate Bias Top by Just Patterns.  I've heard good things about the drafting.Neither of these I've tried 

I did make Kwik Sew K2589 last year.  It is cut on the bias with a narrow, straight grain facing.  It turned out a bit big but Ok to sleep in.

My plan is to draft my own.  If you have a look at this YouTube video by Sew Custom it shows the process, including reducing the neckline for the bust contouring.  Like the Ogden, the side bust dart is rotated as fullness at the hem.  I'm tempted to keep the dart as it may be too much fullness to wear as an underlayer.  I'm hoping to give this a try once the jacket is finished.

Speaking of the jacket, thanks for your lovely comment on the welts.  I think the crispness of the linen made them easier to do, although it has made easing the sleeve caps in a lot harder.  Sleeve head and shoulder pads are in.  Just need to handstitch the sleeve lining into the armhole and do the buttonhole now.

treefrog

@sewordinary Loved reading about your SWAP plan.  Sounds lovely, especially the beaded collar.

Morzel

@Seaglass I usually just true the seam in the back when doing a swayback adjustment. It does shorten the seam even a bit more and adds a bit of fullness. But depending on how much you took out horizontally, it will not show. You could add darts, if there is too much fullness.
Eva

Philippa

Alexandra Morgan of InHouse Patterns goes into the topic of swayback adjustments in her usual forensic fashion in this video -
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rODiDoenH7I

Susan in Saint John

Cashmerette's Springfield Top is another candidate for a silk camisole https://www.cashmerette.com/products/springfield-top-pdf-pattern especially if it eliminates a full bust adjustment for you.  You can eliminate the back yoke and the bottom band.  There is a related course which I found quite useful last summer. https://workshops.cashmerette.com/p/pattern-hacking-for-curves-1-top-10-ways

I am still not ready to commit to SWAP 2020 but this is a pattern I would almost certainly include.

sewsy

Quote from: sewsy on November 22, 2019, 07:46:24 amCCL, hope you and BH will be feeling better soon. I'm still in ruminatin' mode, pulled out two woven wools for the boyfriend jacket idea; one a dark cobalt blue (the wrong side is navy, which would be more to my liking) and a black. Although I don't really want to do a black jacket, I'm leaning more and more towards it.

what may wind up happening is that I do two. One in black wool and one in a beige tweed (one of my first wool purchases) that I got from JoAnns a looooong time ago. It's a tweed wool/silk blend, and I got it back then thinking that it'd make a great jacket. Still do. It'll be fun to finally sew it up.

Well, I think I've hit on what my new technique will be. I've always wanted to do a bona fide tailored garment the way Roberta Carr did in one of her videos. She thread- traced the seam allowances, and I've always wanted to do that. I don't think that I'll do hand tailoring throughout, I will use fusibles, but some techniques I'd like to try are more in line with traditional ways.

Still ruminatin', but the ideas are getting more and more cohesive.

Susan in Saint John

I have learned to prefer sewing this way.  Thread tracing the seam lines is more accurate and then you can make decisions about the best seam allowance later.  The wider seam allowance are there if you need to refine the fit because some fabrics need more ease and others less.  They often press open better too before you trim them.

I hand baste seams too.  It took me a while to get my head around that basting often actually saves time [less ripping out].  It's much easier to sew a basted seam than to stop and start every time you need to remove a pin.  I prefer setting linings by hand too rather than bagging them by machine.

Will you underline?

stephaniecan

I agree with you, Susan. I do a lot of hand basting. It makes me feel I have more control over the process (perhaps an illusion, but I like it! :)).

sewsy

December 02, 2019, 03:24:39 am #132 Last Edit: December 02, 2019, 03:27:42 am by sewsy
Quote from: Susan in Saint John on December 01, 2019, 05:34:34 pmI have learned to prefer sewing this way.  Thread tracing the seam lines is more accurate and then you can make decisions about the best seam allowance later.  The wider seam allowance are there if you need to refine the fit because some fabrics need more ease and others less.  They often press open better too before you trim them.

I hand baste seams too.  It took me a while to get my head around that basting often actually saves time [less ripping out].  It's much easier to sew a basted seam than to stop and start every time you need to remove a pin.  I prefer setting linings by hand too rather than bagging them by machine.

Will you underline?

Thank you, Susan! Seam LINES, not allowances!!!! I have that image of Roberta Carr doing the hand sewing firmly stuck in my memory. Always thought it was impressive. Will I underline? No, I don't think so. I've done quite a bit of underlining, mostly on the prom and homecoming gowns I've made. I'll be using fusibles for inner support of the jackets, so I don't think that underlining will be necessary. If it looks as though it'll be needed later on, then go ahead and do that.

Stephaniecan, I prefer doing hand-basting as well. It really doesn't take much time to do, and I find that I have much more control that when basting things by machine. It's relaxing, as well.



CCL

Quote from: Susan in Saint John on December 01, 2019, 05:34:34 pmI hand baste seams too.  It took me a while to get my head around that basting often actually saves time [less ripping out].  It's much easier to sew a basted seam than to stop and start every time you need to remove a pin.  I prefer setting linings by hand too rather than bagging them by machine.

Raising my hand - another baste most everything person here.  Another advantage is that when sewing for BH or myself, we can try on frequently for fitting.  With dresses, I sometimes will baste up the entire garment for a fitting before I do my machine sewing. I have, however, been trying to perfect the technique of setting sleeves using Wigan.  No basting.  I have been getting pretty smooth insertions, so I am going to continue trying to get better at that.
 
I usually hand sew linings in, but I bagged the lining on the two vests I made for BH this year and I like the way they look for that type of garment.

I usually sew in traditional interfacing and canvas, but again this year I have been having some success with block fusing and so that's another technique I want to keep practicing.

Sewsy, I have gotten nowhere with my planning for SWAP and haven't done much sewing. Got a fleece winter cap whipped for myself and a third vest cut out for BH, but stalled because I didn't have a good match for thread on hand and also not 100% sold on the fabric I cut out for the back and lining. This may be another year when I don't get my act together.  But I still have time, right?   My plan for the sewn after the rules are released and before sewing starts on the 26th have changed from the Pendleton jacket to making a simple grey wool jersey dress, either a tee-neck (modified SA Alexi) or a boat neck. 

Work has been a tad frantic...and we are still recovering and there just hasn't been enough hours in the day to include sewing.

 

Towanda

Over the last few years, I've learned to appreciate hand basting and tailor tacks. I like using the Japanese basting thread or embroidery thread. I keep a needle threaded with basting thread at the cutting table. I found a little incense holder that holds the needle perfectly. It is so convenient and I can add the tailor tacks as I cut out the garment.

CCL - I know that you are really busy but can you do a post on using wigan? I bought some years ago and don't understand how and why you use it. Thanks

Ginger-sews

Whew it's been a couple of busy weeks! I went to visit family in Texas the week before Thanksgiving. My mom quilts and sews a lot so I always take projects and consider it a mini-sewing vacation. My dad is in poor health so we stay home all the time anyway and I sew at the dining room table so we can still "visit". A couple of years ago I ended up with an "extra" machine (#3 for me) that I wasn't thrilled with, so I shipped it to her for birthday/Christmas. This year, I asked about her serger and she said it was on the fritz (it was also about 30 years old), so I sent her a new serger with coverstitch. It's a somewhat selfish gift because I really wanted to sew some knits while I was there but she's thrilled to have it, too... win/win. 

It gave me the chance to sew up some knit tops and test a basic 3/4 sleeve t-shirt/tunic pattern I want to make dozens of. Also gave me the chance to practice threading and rethreading and rethreading the serger and use the coverstitch.  I've posted pics of my makes in my thread.  Even though they don't count as swap pieces, they can mix/match with the navy blue ponte slim-line pants I plan to sew for the swap.

In 3 days I sewed 3 tops and a short knit skirt all from stash. Score!!!

Over Thanksgiving weekend, I made up my TNT pencil skirt pattern in a wool plaid I thought I'd like (I don't) and got a chance to make sure that still fits (it does). I plan to use that pattern for the base of my skirts for the challenge.

So - lots of pre-swapping sewing going on over here and a really fun vacation.
Ginger

sewist, artist, quilter, musician, computer programmer, girlfriend, Grandfriend to one sweet baby, mom, gym rat

Grasshopper

I do a significant amount of hand basting as well.  It just makes the sewing process smoother and more enjoyable for me.  I also prefer to use woven interfacing in almost everything rather than fusible.

@Ginger-sews, bravo on your Thanksgiving sewing progress!  I am currently knee-deep in finishing a T-shirt quilt for a family friend, so I am not making much progress on garment/SWAP sewing yet.
Lyneisa
***************
Striving to live a full, meaningful country life and carry forward the talents and skills of my ancestors.

CCL

December 02, 2019, 02:16:21 pm #137 Last Edit: December 02, 2019, 08:27:56 pm by CCL
Quote from: Towanda on December 02, 2019, 07:03:03 amCCL - I know that you are really busy but can you do a post on using wigan? I bought some years ago and don't understand how and why you use it. Thanks
Towanda - I am just learning myself!  I believe it's basically the equivalent of precut "hair canvas" on the bias. So I would assume one could use it where bias hair canvas is used for structuring.

I have been using it for hems or cuff edges to give them a little structure and support.  Recently I added wigan to the sleeve hems of my jacket.  Here's a quick photo.  Before the step shown in the photo, I tried the jacket on, decided where I wanted the sleeve hem, basted a line, and then notched the sleeve seams at the hem line to reduce bulk. Placed the wigan so the center was along the basted hemline.  I ran a line of what one of my books calls a permanent basting right along the hem edge (the black thread in the photo). Then I catch-stitched the edges to the sleeve seams.


V7975 wigan for sleeve hem - invisible basting

Where I am really loving the wigan is in setting sleeves.  I just substituted wigan for the lamb's wool in the Singer Tailoring book's discussion on using bias strips of lamb's wool to set sleeves. - Sandra Betzina's Power Sewing book has the same basic technique - though she suggests it for leather or difficult to sew fabrics.  I will scann those pages and come back and post them.  The first time I tried the  technique, I couldn't see how it would work, but it did and has the several times since then that I have used it.

I did use the wigan to set the sleeves on the same jacket as in the above photo, but unfortunately I didn't take any photos of the innards, but here is one of the finished jacket. 

V7975  view C jacket finished

V7975- jacket finished - back

I will try to get the instructions up by this evening.

Oh - and Ginger-Sews, love that two piece outfit (and nice to see someone else does bare feet photos!)

CCL

Okay - Not sure how legible these are, but here's the Singer and Betzina instructions:


Bias Strip set in sleeves Singer Tailoring Book



Bias Strip set in sleeves Sandra Betzina Power Sewing

If I think of other things I use the wigan for, will post.

Susan in Saint John

I think you can use bias strips of linen and there is a bias nylon tape about 1" wide which can also be used --- something that was available for finishing seams before sergers were common -- boy am I dating myself!  You need to match the weight of the bias to the fashion fabric.