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SWAP 2020 general discussion thread

Started by Lisanne, October 30, 2019, 05:35:57 am

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Lisanne

from Turquoise's personal thread :
Quote from: Turquoise on November 09, 2019, 01:48:24 pmI'm done with plotting out from my measurements using the techniques from Suzy Furrer classes - . . . it doesn't seem the most constructive  use of my time to reach my goal of getting some personalised blocks so that I can create my own patterns. 

Excellent Turquoise - I spent years weeping and raging over my efforts with various personalised block producing systems before I realised those methods were not the best block-attaining method for me, despite their big claims, and I started draping (fitting trial muslins from basic patterns) instead.
I'm very happy to hear that you and Mahgret have come to this conclusion so early in the process.
Does this bring you joy, calm, confidence  :D  if not, try something else.

https://sewingplums.com - comments on wardrobes, patterns, style, fit
https://uk.pinterest.com/sewingplums/ - style images
https://aimforquality.wordpress.com - good basic sewing techniques
https://easyjackets.wordpress.com - no need for tailoring, unless you want to
https://helpwithsewingpatterninstructions.wordpress.com/2017/03/01/first-blog-post/ - Peggy Sagers sew-alongs

Turquoise

@mahgret I think the Suzy Furrer classes on collars, necklines, dart manipulation etc are still going to be useful to me - it's just that drafting the bodice sloper from scratch hasn't worked well for me compared to working with draping/fitting a muslin from an already completed block. I found her skirt sloper class very easy to use and have made a good skirt block in the past.

For you it might be different - do you have someone who can help you get your measurements that can understand what is required?  For me I was relying on myself mainly and my DH who with the best will in the world was finding it hard to help me take the measurements that were difficult for me to take.

I have had to add length internally to the block I started with today but found that putting on the muslin and marking my real waist, bust points etc on the muslin and comparing that to the marks on the muslin that were traced from the original block is easier for me to get a close match to my body than my attempts at drafting from a set of measurements on paper.  In Suzy Furrer's class you have to make a muslin to test the fit of the moulage, so it's not really such a different process just a different way of making the starting point.

I think this is a process and my original goal to get good fitting blocks to create my own patterns remains - don't get discouraged by my experience you may have better luck using the measurements and drafting yourself or perhaps you might consider using one of your better fitting patterns as a starting point.  I'm still very keen to cooperate in this process of making blocks and exploring patternmaking.  I am sure we can all get to the same end result but being individuals different routes may work better than others.

indigotiger

mahgret - I can delete your extra message for you - I was trying to figure out how to simply move it, but you already did that...

In response to your query about not wanting to do something you had already listed as your challenge, it is entirely possible to change what your challenge is. If your first idea stops being appealing, pick something else. As long as at the end of SWAP in April, you have included at least one thing in your garments that was a desired new to you skill, be it technical, a new fabric, a new kind of garment, etc, then that aspect is covered...
※※※※※※※※※

I went back and read that K.Fassanella article, and noticed a few important caveats regarding patternmaking, drafting a sloper, etc... I, like a number of folks here, have some real fitting challenges in how my size and shape vary from the standard body-types used for commercial patterns (tiny narrow shoulders, disproportional large bust, very shortwaisted, petite and plus size at the same time, and so on).

In the article, which does present a  Very Good Point as far as how much time is saved starting with actual patterns rather than starting from scratch and drafting a sloper, what is never mentioned is what if one is a person for whom both commercial patterns and RTW clothing do not fit at all well? Sure, when someone is designing a line of clothing they have basic blocks for the types of garments they want to make, or manufacture.
QuoteNow, the way we do it is to buy or use something that is similar to what we want to do and we fit that. Then we use a basic body -a block or an existing pattern, the fit of which we already like- and transfer to that, whatever the distinctive features of the new style. Plus, we make our fit changes. This way our first prototype will come out looking pretty good.
And there are three places where in the process it is necessary to have already put in or continue to put in the time fitting the prototypes to get good results

That is what, in a similar way, is what I try to do by developing my own set of TNT patterns for the basic garments in my everyday wardrobe, which can then have changes made as far as details like sleeves, collars, pockets etc... I've never made a sloper myself, as the necessary measurements seem difficult to take without help. I have seriously considered it though, as it probably takes me at least as long to work out the fitting issues with developing a TNT pattern - at least 5 or more toiles per - as it would to start by making a sloper, which could then be used to adapt future patterns without having to be made anew each time. Really I see the question as being one of "choose your adventure"...
The Things that Make us Happy Make us Wise.

Read about my daily life at Acorn Cottage ~ Acorn Cottage Artisanry

"It is known (to some) that by dwelling in the present, conceding what is necessary to past and future, but no more than is necessary, it is quite possible to live happily ever after"      - Edgar Pangborn

Lisanne

Quote from: indigotiger on November 09, 2019, 04:01:34 pmit probably takes me at least as long to work out the fitting issues with developing a TNT pattern - at least 5 or more toiles per - as it would to start by making a sloper, which could then be used to adapt future patterns without having to be made anew each time.

In pattern making, the block making and the adapting the block to make other styles, are 2 entirely independent stages.
You can do the 'altering to make another style' processes on any starting pattern.
So you can use your TNTs as blocks for basic styles you usually wear.  Doing block drafting as in pattern making books and classes is not an essential first step for making your own styles.
Does this bring you joy, calm, confidence  :D  if not, try something else.

https://sewingplums.com - comments on wardrobes, patterns, style, fit
https://uk.pinterest.com/sewingplums/ - style images
https://aimforquality.wordpress.com - good basic sewing techniques
https://easyjackets.wordpress.com - no need for tailoring, unless you want to
https://helpwithsewingpatterninstructions.wordpress.com/2017/03/01/first-blog-post/ - Peggy Sagers sew-alongs

Turquoise

I've just seen that Lekala have patterns that could be used as starting points for making blocks now on their site.  You can put in your height and basic measurements and there are options for customisations like narrow shoulders, broad back etc.

Woven dress sloper

https://www.lekala.co/catalog/women/dresses/pattern/4815#model

Knit dress sloper

https://www.lekala.co/catalog/women/dresses/pattern/4812#model

These might create an inexpensive starting point that can be refined with muslin(s).  Generally I have found their patterns OK but quite close fitting.

Lisanne

Quote from: Turquoise on November 09, 2019, 03:57:19 pmdo you have someone who can help you get your measurements that can understand what is required?

Sadly that is not the only problem with these systems.  As Mahgret has noted, Suzy Furrer often uses 'industry standard' measures, and she tells you to draw curves by eye.  It may be that, for a specific person's fitting, it is exactly those measures and curves which need to be personalised.  So this draft will need a great deal of adjustment before they have a good result.

Liechty & Co. in their fitting book list 88 fitting issues.  I have counted the fitting issues which can be dealt with by many of the pattern drafting systems, and it is usually about quarter of the issues listed by Liechty & Co.  So these pattern drafting methods may work well for someone who is close to average.  But if you have the other 3/4 of the fitting issues, you are going to have to do an awful lot of adjusting your drafted block.  For me personally, I have so many fitting specialities, it takes me as long to adjust a personal draft as it does to adjust a basic commercial pattern to fit.  So, as you previously noted, drafting is not the best use of my time. 

Yes we do have to put the work in, there is no magic method which will give most of us a perfect fit without much effort on our part.  But we only have to do it once, whether we start from a drafted pattern or from a commercial pattern for a basic style.
When we've done it once, we have that amazing tool, a personal block, which we can adapt to make many other styles.   :applause2:
Does this bring you joy, calm, confidence  :D  if not, try something else.

https://sewingplums.com - comments on wardrobes, patterns, style, fit
https://uk.pinterest.com/sewingplums/ - style images
https://aimforquality.wordpress.com - good basic sewing techniques
https://easyjackets.wordpress.com - no need for tailoring, unless you want to
https://helpwithsewingpatterninstructions.wordpress.com/2017/03/01/first-blog-post/ - Peggy Sagers sew-alongs

stephaniecan

Quote from: indigotiger on November 09, 2019, 04:01:34 pmReally I see the question as being one of "choose your adventure"...

Following this discussion with great interest, although I don't have anything particularly useful to contribute. I find that indigotiger's statement above rings true, however. What you want to do also depends on whether you are a product or a process person. For example, as a knitter, I'm a pure process person, and to some extent in sewing, too. I've been knitting for more than forty years, so I have made just about everything over the years and so I don't feel in a rush to make lots of things (whereas a new knitter might). I enjoy knitting, so I will happily knit along on something that I end up not finishing, ripping out and making something else with. I don't skip a beat.

When I picked up sewing again (had been an avid if rather careless seamstress in my 20s but let it drop in my 30s) about ten years ago now, I was impatient to get to an end result so I was definitely more of a product person. Now that I have invested significant time and spent a lot of time thinking about styles that I like and that suit me, and feeling angst over fitting issues, I am more curious about the architecture and geometry of sewing and so have more patience.

For me the key takeaway here is that there's no need to feel badly about starting with something that already fits or that was made by someone else (e.g. a commercial pattern or sloper). Whatever gets a person to what will satisfy his or her needs is best!

mahgret

Turquoise- I do not really have someone who can help me with the measurements.  I was sort of thinking about that as I was watching the video, and feeling a bit like it might just make me sad, since my husband used to help with things like this. 

Indigotiger - thank you for deleting my post.  I am not anywhere near standard size, and I was thinking drafting from scratch would get me closer to fitting than existing patterns, but I'm seeing now that might not be so.  I do have the other Suzy Furrer classes about collars, sleeves, darts, etc that I might be able to incorporate into my TNT tops without starting from nothing.

Morzel

I for one have good results drafting my own patterns. But, as others stated, it is not the holy grail that I guess some sewer wish for! The drafting methods just give you a 'beginners set' of numbers to work with. Through lots of drafting, sewing, trying out you eventually get to the point where you know what exactly is required, what YOUR 'numbers' are. And with even more experience, you get to the point where you can look at a person and measure them and can draft for them from scratch - my sewing teacher is such a person, but she's done that for almost 60 years now. And then there are the details: How wide should the collar be, how pointy? How flouncy will the volant look when I cut it this way or that? How deep should my V-neck be? etc.

So, even when drafting yourself, you start off with a basic pattern, which you have to fit/drape/proove, because there are other numbers than your measurement that have to used. These other numbers have to be assumed at first, to give you a starting point. For example, in my drafting system, we assume the angle of the shoulder, the angle of the bust dart (proportional to your Bust measurement), the width of the neck etc. This probably corresponds to the 'industry standards' @Lisanne mentioned. When I sewed up my first top, it sure was wearable (because I don't differ that much from standard), but nowadays I use different shoulder angles and a different bust angle. I learned from my previous makes to alter these 'inner numbers'. So now I can draft any pattern I think up and it will fit me well enough (given there are different fabrics that behave different). I will draft anew,  because I want to change stuff like circumference or armhole depth. (think blouse vs. jacket/coat).

Peggy Sagers (I love her videos on fitting) does check inner numbers also, by having you make a muslin (she already has you use different bust angle options with her B-D cup) and then looking at it for changes: at the shoulder (shoulder angle, shoulder width), at the bust (angle, heigth) etc. So, you save yourself the need of drafting the pattern and jump onto the wagon when the draping starts. And if you use a basic pattern for drafting, you have your basic (e.g. blouse) block!

I am with @indigotiger though, when it comes to unusual figures. If you are far from the standard, I think drafting your own patterns with the possibility to use unsusual measurements (like narrow shoulders, short waist, big bust, whatever) makes things easier. You would still have to get those 'inner numbers' right first. But you would only have to get those right ONE TIME. Then you can use them, no matter if you draft a sheath dress, a loose blouse or a thick wool coat. If you were to use commercial patterns, you would need to work on each standard TNT anew with some things.

So I guess both methods, drafting your own and altering a commercial pattern, are fine to use. Both methods mean hard work. With both, there will be muslins. You need to read up on pattern fitting. And, you just pick the method that appeals to you more.
Eva

Lisanne

November 10, 2019, 03:02:25 am #79 Last Edit: November 10, 2019, 04:26:55 am by Lisanne
Quote from: Morzel on November 10, 2019, 12:36:32 am(because I don't differ that much from standard)

Sorry but I think this the reason (along with a very experienced teacher) why very lucky Morzel has had success with drafting.  And why she is able to make most of her optimistic later remarks.
As I said above, drafting methods do not include about 3/4 of fitting issues.

Quote from: Morzel on November 10, 2019, 12:36:32 amIf you were to use commercial patterns, you would need to work on each standard TNT anew with some things.

You use basic patterns (ones with no added style elements) for the main styles you wear.  For example, apart from my close fitting blocks, I have 3 : a raglan top and, as I like to wear over-sized clothes, a casual top with 12"/30cm ease, and a casual top with 18"/45cm ease.  I could not have derived those easily from my close fitting block as they have dropped shoulders so different armholes.

Quote from: Morzel on November 10, 2019, 12:36:32 amPeggy Sagers (I love her videos on fitting)

Sadly that is another issue on which groups of us differ.  Some of us have good luck with Peggy Sagers methods, others not at all.  There was a long discussion about this on the old Peggy Sagers thread.  Even the fitting sequence she advises does not work for me.

Quote from: Morzel on November 10, 2019, 12:36:32 amBoth methods mean hard work. With both, there will be muslins. You need to read up on pattern fitting.

Yes indeed, there is no magic wand, however much the easy fitting methods (including drafting) claim they are supplying it. 
Again unless you're lucky with a good teacher, for those of us who are far from average it's not just a simple matter of reading any fitting book to find the fitting methods we need.
Liechty & Co. Fitting and Pattern Alteration is a major investment, but changed my fitting life.  It gave me solutions to fitting issues that the many other fitting books I had read did not even mention.

The only easy fitting method which works for everyone is to get a good professional dressmaker or teacher to do the fitting for us, but most of us do not have access to such as person.
Does this bring you joy, calm, confidence  :D  if not, try something else.

https://sewingplums.com - comments on wardrobes, patterns, style, fit
https://uk.pinterest.com/sewingplums/ - style images
https://aimforquality.wordpress.com - good basic sewing techniques
https://easyjackets.wordpress.com - no need for tailoring, unless you want to
https://helpwithsewingpatterninstructions.wordpress.com/2017/03/01/first-blog-post/ - Peggy Sagers sew-alongs

Melinda_B

I'm in, although my track record for completing SWAP is currently at a big fat zero!  I'm hoping to get a lot done before the start date, in the hope that will keep me going.
Melinda

Perth, Australia
Personal Blog - https://melbrennan.com/

stephaniecan

Melinda: I hope your leg is fully better! I also am a bit questionable in terms of finishing (have started and not finished a couple of times). The big mistake I have made is not getting more done before Dec 26. Good plan to start early!

Morzel

Quote from: Lisanne on November 10, 2019, 03:02:25 amAs I said above, drafting methods do not include about 3/4 of fitting issues.

You are absolutley right, Lisanne. That's why after drafting there comes the draping - to do the fine tuning. That's what some sewers don't realise. It is not enough to just draft.

Quote from: Lisanne on November 10, 2019, 03:02:25 amLiechty & Co. Fitting and Pattern Alteration is a major investment, but changed my fitting life.  It gave me solutions to fitting issues that the many other fitting books I had read did not even mention.

Yes, a wonderful book!

Quote from: Lisanne on November 10, 2019, 03:02:25 amThe only easy fitting method which works for everyone is to get a good professional dressmaker or teacher to do the fitting for us.

:)) Yes, that is certainly the only easy way!
Eva

indigotiger

Eeeee! I just checked our local library, and they have the Liechty & Co. "Fitting and Pattern Alteration" book available in the circulating collection... I just put it on hold.
The Things that Make us Happy Make us Wise.

Read about my daily life at Acorn Cottage ~ Acorn Cottage Artisanry

"It is known (to some) that by dwelling in the present, conceding what is necessary to past and future, but no more than is necessary, it is quite possible to live happily ever after"      - Edgar Pangborn

Melinda_B

Quote from: stephaniecan on November 10, 2019, 07:45:52 amMelinda: I hope your leg is fully better!

My legs are great,  up to running 40-50km per week now.

If we did a SWAP for activewear then I'd have no issues finishing!
Melinda

Perth, Australia
Personal Blog - https://melbrennan.com/

Lisanne

November 11, 2019, 02:33:07 am #85 Last Edit: November 12, 2019, 02:37:29 am by Lisanne
Quote from: Melinda_B on November 10, 2019, 07:08:12 ammy track record for completing SWAP is currently at a big fat zero!

That's true for most of us.  I've never finished a SWAP.  I used to feel guilty about it, but no more.  Those of us who think about what our needs are and how to plan a small group of co-ordinated clothes, but do little sewing, have gained much benefit.  People who just follow what is happening get much pleasure  :heart_smilie:

Quote from: Melinda_B on November 10, 2019, 08:28:00 pmIf we did a SWAP for activewear then I'd have no issues finishing!

Then do it  :thumbsup:  Well, your ideas for upgraded workwear sound good too  :heart:

Does this bring you joy, calm, confidence  :D  if not, try something else.

https://sewingplums.com - comments on wardrobes, patterns, style, fit
https://uk.pinterest.com/sewingplums/ - style images
https://aimforquality.wordpress.com - good basic sewing techniques
https://easyjackets.wordpress.com - no need for tailoring, unless you want to
https://helpwithsewingpatterninstructions.wordpress.com/2017/03/01/first-blog-post/ - Peggy Sagers sew-alongs

Lisanne

November 11, 2019, 02:49:16 am #86 Last Edit: November 11, 2019, 03:08:31 am by Lisanne
Quote from: Turquoise on November 10, 2019, 01:34:27 pmMuslin number 3 is good to go and so now I have a version of the very close-fitting moulage the drafting process was intended to make but via draping.   

I really appreciate everyone who added comments about their experience in making blocks etc, as that prompted me to change how I was approaching this and has helped me get this first stage done much more quickly. 

I will also look at the finished garment measurements of clothes I like to help decide the ease I want for the different types of blocks.

Excellent, well done for doing the work needed in the 'least effort' way that works for you  :thumbsup:
A well fitting personal block is one of the gifts in life  :D
Does this bring you joy, calm, confidence  :D  if not, try something else.

https://sewingplums.com - comments on wardrobes, patterns, style, fit
https://uk.pinterest.com/sewingplums/ - style images
https://aimforquality.wordpress.com - good basic sewing techniques
https://easyjackets.wordpress.com - no need for tailoring, unless you want to
https://helpwithsewingpatterninstructions.wordpress.com/2017/03/01/first-blog-post/ - Peggy Sagers sew-alongs

stephaniecan

Quote from: Melinda_B on November 10, 2019, 08:28:00 pm
Quote from: stephaniecan on November 10, 2019, 07:45:52 amMelinda: I hope your leg is fully better!

My legs are great,  up to running 40-50km per week now.

If we did a SWAP for activewear then I'd have no issues finishing!

That's great, Melinda! I had forgotten that it was both legs. Great news.

I am getting quite excited about this year's SWAP. I was just going to sew along, but I think I'm likely going to participate. I've taken on Ruthie's advice from last year: Sew little and sew often. I feel quite pleased as I am currently working on improving my old shirt TNT and also on my skirts. I have a pretty good block, which I am tweaking. I spent a happy day measuring and cutting out muslins! This simple, careful sewing gives me so much pleasure!

warpjr1965

So excited that Stephanie, Morzel, and Seaglass are joining in!

Seaglass, my first SWAP was ages ago, I hadn't sewn for myself in years, and I just dove in and finished. I was, and still am, so proud of that first set of garments. I've also learned so much since then.  As you said, if you keep at it, keep it simple, you can totally do it.

I am having to force myself to concentrate on finishing DD's jacket  so that I can then get started on the moto jacket that is doubling as my post-rules garment and CCL's jacket challenge.

I also find myself wandering away from my initial inspiration, but I think it is toward something more cohesive and wearable.
Wendy

treefrog

Quote from: indigotiger on November 10, 2019, 12:19:06 pmEeeee! I just checked our local library, and they have the Liechty & Co. "Fitting and Pattern Alteration" book available in the circulating collection... I just put it on hold.

Oh you lucky duck!  I'd love to have a look at it to see if it is worth buying.  I joined our local library earlier in the year and I'm on a mission to borrow my council rates worth in books.

@Melinda_B  The bright coloured tops with the grey and navy bottoms sound so good.  Glad to hear that you are back running again.  Do you think you might do an activewear SWAP?  I was thinking of doing one as my exercise clothes are getting very worn.

@warpjr1965  - The moto jacket sounds great.  Which pattern are you thinking of using?

@Seaglass -  Sounds like I wonderful plan.  I like the colour palette you have chosen.

-----
As for me, I haven't made any more progress on the plan.  Dear Hubby has asked me to make him a woodworkers jacket from a very vague description of what it looks like.  It's almost done, just needing the velco tab added to the collar.

stephaniecan

Thanks for the kind words, Wendy!

Seaglass: Your SWAP sounds perfect. (And I really love the "pearls, just because!" Perfect!)

Towanda: Your plans seem certain to result in a SWAP that will be striking and yet can integrate well into an existing wardrobe.

Treefrog: I want to hear more about the woodworkers jacket! The type of utilitarian jacket I am imagining is probably my favourite type of garment. 


Sew Ruthie Sews

@Seaglass, great that you are joining us. The inspiration is lovely, simple yet nuanced.

@stephaniecan :-) I hope you wouldn't resist. The rules can be made to work for many situations I feel.

@kushami, wow you've got lots of ideas going on!

@Towanda so glad you've been inspired to join in. Interesting that we've chosen similar(ish) colour schemes. One plus for red and black is its easy to find co-ordinating accessories. I'm hoping my cute red shoes will get an outing :-)

I have a few mending/alteration tasks to finish before I can jump into my SWAP planning in earnest I always find this time of year tricky in the SWAP cycle, as I'm super inspired but its too early - but sewing a black coat in this low winter light should be a good challenge!
Ruthie in Derbyshire UK
http://ruthieksews1.blogspot.co.uk/

Lisanne

Kushami : can you look at a RTW garment and add your own rivets where they have them ?  :thumbsup:
Does this bring you joy, calm, confidence  :D  if not, try something else.

https://sewingplums.com - comments on wardrobes, patterns, style, fit
https://uk.pinterest.com/sewingplums/ - style images
https://aimforquality.wordpress.com - good basic sewing techniques
https://easyjackets.wordpress.com - no need for tailoring, unless you want to
https://helpwithsewingpatterninstructions.wordpress.com/2017/03/01/first-blog-post/ - Peggy Sagers sew-alongs

Lisanne

November 12, 2019, 02:45:26 am #93 Last Edit: November 12, 2019, 02:59:49 am by Lisanne
Seaglass - I got my A-cup bust dart from McCall's 2718.
It's a dress gingham fitting pattern, separate sizes 6-22, each with 5 fronts for cup sizes A-DD
(choosing pattern size by (bust = upper bust + 2") will probably give the best result)
https://mccallpattern.mccall.com/m2718

I haven't tried Connie Crawford's bodice sloper, which comes in 2 cup size ranges, A-E and F-I, all torso sizes (8-20) in the same envelope.  There's also a 1X-6X pattern, but the site doesn't say what cup sizes are included in that.
https://stores.islandersewing.com/a-cs1201-designers-blouse-block-sloper/
Does this bring you joy, calm, confidence  :D  if not, try something else.

https://sewingplums.com - comments on wardrobes, patterns, style, fit
https://uk.pinterest.com/sewingplums/ - style images
https://aimforquality.wordpress.com - good basic sewing techniques
https://easyjackets.wordpress.com - no need for tailoring, unless you want to
https://helpwithsewingpatterninstructions.wordpress.com/2017/03/01/first-blog-post/ - Peggy Sagers sew-alongs

Melinda_B

Quote from: Lisanne on November 11, 2019, 02:33:07 am
Quote from: Melinda_B on November 10, 2019, 08:28:00 pmIf we did a SWAP for activewear then I'd have no issues finishing!

Then do it  :thumbsup:  Well, your ideas for upgraded workwear sound good too  :heart: 

I've thought about it, but I don't need that much activewear!  Although if I did both running and cycling items, it could work maybe.....
Melinda

Perth, Australia
Personal Blog - https://melbrennan.com/

Ginger-sews

It's so cool to see what everybody's planning. I know I'm enjoying the planning and dreaming process and I'm starting to test out some patterns on other fabric.

The sloper discussion is interesting. I have a simple straight skirt pattern with a contoured waistband that I've worked out for skirts. It was a big 4 pattern that I made up and spent time tweaking until it fits just right. Now I trace it out and play around a little bit with it.

If you're looking for help in drafting - I used a straight pattern to start with and then use the instructions in this book to turn it into a wrap or flare it out or whatever. The book has instructions for drafting your own, but I start with a basic pattern I know fits. I find I can do most of what I want to skirts. Much easier to muck around with than hacking tops.



I'm heading on sort-of-vacay to visit family next week and when I'm there, I always use my mom's sewing machine to make some things - so I have to get together my "not official swap" fabric to take and take some of the patterns I want to try. Or, I could just focus on knitting my 'between-rules-being-announced-and-date-you-can-start-sewing" piece.

Having a great time planning anyway...
Ginger
Ginger

sewist, artist, quilter, musician, computer programmer, girlfriend, Grandfriend to one sweet baby, mom, gym rat

angelsweb

Seaglass, I've made multiple versions of the Palmer/Pletsch camp shirts over the years and I think you'll be fine without an SBA. As you mentioned, it's a unisex pattern, so there's not a lot of extra fabric in front.

Seaglass wrote:

Decided to get a bit of a head start on a basic camp shirt pattern (Mc Calls).  Have some of it traced and cut out.  I'm debating on making it straight off the pattern for the first attempt, or should I try a SBA?

warpjr1965

@treefrog I'm planning on this: https://mccallpattern.mccall.com/m7694

I don't love the pleat in the back, but I do like the shaped bottom band. I'll have to muslin it to see how it fits.
Wendy

indigotiger

QuoteI don't love the pleat in the back, but I do like the shaped bottom band. I'll have to muslin it to see how it fits.
given the location of the pleat, it isn't there to provide additional ease of movement, but appears to be a design detail, so you could probably leave it out of your jacket without any ill effects. While actual moto-jackets often have pleats or gussets, they are always in areas where extra motion is needed, usually across the shoulders or armscye gussets... (I know because I worked in a motorcycle jacket factory years ago when I was young)
The Things that Make us Happy Make us Wise.

Read about my daily life at Acorn Cottage ~ Acorn Cottage Artisanry

"It is known (to some) that by dwelling in the present, conceding what is necessary to past and future, but no more than is necessary, it is quite possible to live happily ever after"      - Edgar Pangborn

stephaniecan

Ginger, That is very nice advice.

I think everyone will appreciate this: a pipe burst in my spare bedroom today (beautiful but old house) and miraculously the side of the room with my stash and my spare sewing machine did not get touched by water! It's a sign! I must do a SWAP before the next time (when I might not be so lucky).

kushami

November 12, 2019, 11:42:50 pm #100 Last Edit: November 14, 2019, 09:52:20 pm by kushami
Quote from: warpjr1965 on November 12, 2019, 04:10:36 pm@treefrog I'm planning on this: https://mccallpattern.mccall.com/m7694

I don't love the pleat in the back, but I do like the shaped bottom band. I'll have to muslin it to see how it fits.

That's a cool pattern, Wendy. Don't know if you already saw this, but one person made it without the pleat: https://sewing.patternreview.com/review/pattern/147811
Sarah from Australia

Turquoise

@BinMI Thank you for introducing me to T-shirt and jeans handbook book. 

I was rummaging through fabrics in the stash again last night to try and get a cohesive group and thinking about the rules and kept coming back to the fact that really most of the time I like wearing the skinny jeans silhouette as the base of my dressing.  I've always been lucky with RTW skinny jeans fitting pretty well, even when I was heavier -  it's tops and jackets that are more of a challenge to find good fit. 

I've bought lots of RTW skinny jeans recently in different colours and types of fabric to replace the old ones that were too big but I have a huge gap now I've donated most of my old tops and jackets to the charity shop. It makes the most sense for me to concentrate on making tops and jackets for my SWAP and reading your SWAP post has helped me commit to that.  I look forward to reading the book for further inspiration  :)

@kushami I really like the Simplicity 8554 jacket you are looking at. Re: denim skirt -  have you seen the Leonora jeans style skirt?  This has rivets and I think Colette patterns are aimed more towards a pear shape and the instructions are always great.

https://www.colettepatterns.com/catalog/leonora

@Ginger-sews - your SWAP plans are really coming together, I love the patchwork fabric ideas.  I'm also trying to just keep to fabrics in the stash, but it's hard not to be attracted to new fabrics too isn't it  :))

@stephaniecan - thank goodness the stash and machine escaped the burst pipe.  Hope it's not too messy/expensive to clear up. 

We also have a very old house and a pipe went in the kitchen a few years ago.  Thankfully I was home and my sister was visiting and we both kept remarking on the strange noise and managed to get the plumber out before the water got too bad.  The water stopcock was also old and stiff and neither of us could shift it.  Now I check it regularly to make sure I could turn it off quickly in an emergency.

stephaniecan

Really liked your comments, Turquoise.

I also read through Ginger's SWAP plans last night and was impressed by how well-developed and cohesive they were.

Also, you make a great point about understanding the silhouette you like to wear and working with that. I realize I'm the same. I tend to prefer slim bottoms. So I should work within that frame.

The pipe situation was very similar. I kept on hearing strange gurgling but I didn't think to check the spare room, unfortunately. It was caught fairly early but I wish I had caught it earlier. I was hearing some odd noises while listening to the morning news and I thought they were coming from the radio! Oops! Now another pipe is on watch and hopefully if the guy finds the part will be replaced today or tomorrow.

Morzel

@warpjr1965 , great jacket pattern! Love that curved bottom band in the back.

@BinMI what an interesting book title! I am looking forward to your collection - I could use some inspiration in that category as well!

@stephaniecan what good fortune in discovering the leakage early on! Hope the plumbing work is quickly done and not too tiresome.

Worked on those flowy light weight fabric pants. First one (trial run) fits great with minor changes. Second one will be done in near future, third one (No7 summer pants) off the table, as the crotch pattern was sooo off from the other two and my regular pants pattern (much narrower), I will not go down that muslin road.
Also drafted up a jacket pattern this morning, not sure when there will be time to muslin it, as there are other projects also in line.
Eva

stephaniecan

Thanks, Eva: All OK here. I'm so impressed by your progress so far!