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Author Topic: Singer Treadle Attachments  (Read 498 times)

kowgiirl.up

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Singer Treadle Attachments
« on: April 23, 2018, 06:20:59 PM »

I dug out the Singer treadle on Saturday to practice treadling. While I was at it I decided to dig through the drawer to look at all the attachments that came with the machine. I have no idea what most of these do and one of the interesting ones is a long "tube" that has a nail inside. Odd. There are actually two of these that are different sizes. I found several of these nails in the drawer as well. Whatever it does it must have been pretty important to have that many extra nails I figure.

One of the attachments has a patent date of 1913 ~ pretty cool.

I thought it might be fun to post a pic to see if any of you have a clue as to what they are and what they do. ~ Enjoy ~

I suck at treadling by the way  ::)



Edited for size
« Last Edit: April 24, 2018, 11:23:06 PM by kowgiirl.up »
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Theresa

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Lisanne

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Re: Singer Treadle Attachments
« Reply #1 on: April 23, 2018, 07:56:27 PM »

What fun ! 
Having never been within using distance of a treadle machine, I have no idea what the long things are.
But some of the items are recognisable as presser feet with modern equivalents.
There are also a couple of flat screwdrivers.


(the other way up) attach to the right of presser foot and run the edge of the fabric against it


sets width of seam allowance


rolled hem foot


used for folding a double fold hem as you sew


for attaching bias binding


possibly a ruffler


possibly a gatherer
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Lisanne

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Re: Singer Treadle Attachments
« Reply #2 on: April 23, 2018, 08:02:58 PM »

P.S. isn't it interesting that several of the special purpose presser feet we use today have been in that form since the early days of sewing machines !
P.P.S. no zipper foot, but perhaps zippers had not been invented yet.
« Last Edit: April 23, 2018, 08:05:43 PM by Lisanne »
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Elephun

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Re: Singer Treadle Attachments
« Reply #3 on: April 23, 2018, 08:16:06 PM »

It looks like you have a tucker. More info on how to use a tucker here.


ETA:
Singer Sewing Info - Accessories: look up parts by photo or part number

This is the attachment manual for the Singer 27 and 127, which may be the model you have.

Underbraider

Here's a video on using an underbraider, though it is a different type than I think you have. I think you have one shaped more like this one in the photo.

I think you've got a shirring plate in there, too!

« Last Edit: April 24, 2018, 10:08:54 PM by Elephun »
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Elephun

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Re: Singer Treadle Attachments
« Reply #4 on: April 23, 2018, 09:08:15 PM »

I also think you have a cutting gauge that attaches to shears. Take a look at page 22 in this Franklin manual to see.
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bessiecrocker

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Re: Singer Treadle Attachments
« Reply #5 on: April 24, 2018, 10:30:49 AM »

Based on what I know from using my mom's old singer, which was not a treadle but had lots of doodads...I think you've got most of the attachments correctly identified.

I'm going to venture a wild guess here to give you something to research further... I think the nails were makeshift long bobbins! Which fit inside the "bobbin case." The dark metal thing at the bottom center looks like some kind of shuttle bobbin. How this all would work is a totally mystery to me...but I'm wishing you luck and fun  trying to figure that out.

I'm asking myself if this machine was used for some special purposes: such as shoe repair, that might have needed thicker threads?

the other dark metal thing with the circular end is probably just a wrench for fixing or attaching the bits. I have no guesses for the long thin nail-y things at upper right. 
« Last Edit: April 24, 2018, 10:33:15 AM by bessiecrocker »
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Elephun

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Re: Singer Treadle Attachments
« Reply #6 on: April 24, 2018, 04:34:55 PM »

The long things in the upper right might be for an older machine needlework technique that I cannot remember the name of. The rods or needles are laid down and sewn over in sort of a weaving way to accomplish embroidery. You might catch a glimpse of it being described in this clip.
So far, I canít find the longer clip showing how to do the technique or what itís called. If I do find or remember anything, Iíll jump back in.
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Lisanne

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Re: Singer Treadle Attachments
« Reply #7 on: April 24, 2018, 07:17:08 PM »

Many thanks Elephun for the underbraider video.  I had one of those gadgets with the hand cranked Singer I used as a child, but never explored what it was for !
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https://helpwithsewingpatterninstructions.wordpress.com/2017/03/01/first-blog-post/ - Peggy Sagers sew-alongs

kowgiirl.up

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Re: Singer Treadle Attachments
« Reply #8 on: April 24, 2018, 11:39:58 PM »

P.S. isn't it interesting that several of the special purpose presser feet we use today have been in that form since the early days of sewing machines !
P.P.S. no zipper foot, but perhaps zippers had not been invented yet.

Yes, it's pretty cool. I have to admire the skill that the folks had while using the treadle machine. Lots going on at once and you really have to concentrate on what you are doing. I'll check the other drawers to see if I can find a zipper foot. They must of had zippers by the 1900's??

It looks like you have a tucker. More info on how to use a tucker here
ETA:
Singer Sewing Info - Accessoriesook up parts by photo or part number

This is the attachment manual for the Singer 27 and 127, which may be the model you have.

UnderbraiderHere's a video on using an underbraider, though it is a different type than I think you have. I think you have one shaped more like this one in the photo.

I think you've got a shirring plate in there, too!

Thank you for all those links. I subscribed to the gal showing how to use the pin tuck attachment. I had seen her video's a long time ago and forgot all about it.


I'm asking myself if this machine was used for some special purposes: such as shoe repair, that might have needed thicker threads?

Bessie, your comment struck me on the head. This machine came to my husband and I from his Mother who got it from her Mother after she passed. Funny tidbit here>> The Grandmother had painted the cabinet orange and his Mother had it stripped and refinished when she got it~ thank goodness!
Anyway, the Grandmother did book binding for the local schools when she lived in Montana. My hubby can remember this machine sitting in her workroom at the old farmhouse. There were strict orders for the kids to not enter that room. I'm not sure if she used the machine as part of the binding work or not but I thought that books used to be sewn?

This has been a fun thread with some Sherlock Holmes investigation LOL. I'll keep investigating and report back if I learn anything new.

Thanks ladies :)
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Theresa

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Elephun

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Re: Singer Treadle Attachments
« Reply #9 on: April 25, 2018, 12:30:53 AM »

Thank goodness for youtube, huh? The underbraider probably seemed like a great idea at the time, especially for users of hand-powered machines. I suppose it would have been nearly impossible to apply a trim neatly while running the machine with your right arm, at least without hand basting it first. I guess there are modern presser feet that make this obsolete, though I don't have any of them, myself.

The standard presser foot might be quite narrow, and therefore be useful for zippers. You may be able to use a modern adjustable screw on zipper foot, if you have one around, too.

A couple of months ago, I was staying at a hotel while the house was being tented for termites. I went to a thrift store and came back to the hotel with the head only of a treadle machine. Did I need this? No. I can only say that the hotel had zero sewing machines in the room, and that must not have been enough sewing machines for me. I've been learning about and cleaning the machine little by little. Mine is a Franklin, made by Domestic, which was sold at Sears. It's a Singer 27/127 knock off. I've been learning about both types of treadle machines, since there is more information about the Singers and they are so similar. Eventually I'd like to set it up with a treadle, but I'm not in a hurry for that. I have collected bobbins and a shuttle (bobbin case), a box of attachments, and a knob to make it easier to spin the wheel to make it sew. Anyhoo- I've done lots of research and watched lots of videos over the last couple of months, so it's fresh on my mind!

Have fun investigating, and treadling!
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Lisanne

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Re: Singer Treadle Attachments
« Reply #10 on: April 25, 2018, 07:36:54 AM »

Did I need this? No. I can only say that the hotel had zero sewing machines in the room, and that must not have been enough sewing machines for me.

I hear you - I have worked abroad for a couple of lengthy periods, and each time quickly bought a secondhand sewing machine - which made me relax and feel at home, even if I didn't do any sewing.
Though sadly my life has never included a treadle. 
Hmm, now I'm in a flat (apartment) and already have 2 machines and getting an embroidery machine, I really do need to restrain myself to following your links  ;D
Hmm, Hmm again, I like edwardian style so perhaps it could be part of the decor. . .
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https://helpwithsewingpatterninstructions.wordpress.com/2017/03/01/first-blog-post/ - Peggy Sagers sew-alongs

Lisanne

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Re: Singer Treadle Attachments
« Reply #11 on: April 25, 2018, 07:46:05 AM »

Anyway, the Grandmother did book binding for the local schools when she lived in Montana.

Ah, that probably explains the tubes with nails in them - they could be for rough book binding or other heavy leather work.  Use the nail to bash a hole through what is being bound, then replace it with the tube, through which you can thread a thick cord.

In hand-done book binding, sheets of paper are sewn together in groups, before being combined in a book cover.
« Last Edit: April 25, 2018, 09:22:10 AM by Lisanne »
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Does this bring you joy, calm, confidence  :D  if not, try something else.

https://sewingplums.com - comments on wardrobes, patterns, style, fit
https://uk.pinterest.com/sewingplums/ - style images
https://aimforquality.wordpress.com - good basic sewing techniques
https://easyjackets.wordpress.com - no need for tailoring, unless you want to
https://helpwithsewingpatterninstructions.wordpress.com/2017/03/01/first-blog-post/ - Peggy Sagers sew-alongs

Lisanne

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Re: Singer Treadle Attachments
« Reply #12 on: April 25, 2018, 08:05:14 AM »

They must of had zippers by the 1900's??

According to this article
https://wonderopolis.org/wonder/who-invented-the-zipper
the modern zipper was invented in 1913, first used on boots and tobacco pouches, and didnít reach the garment industry until 20 years later. 

So probably available to home sewers much later than that.  When I was a child (40s to early 50s before plastic) they were still very bulky clunky metal things.  The Singer I first used about 1950 did have a zipper foot.
« Last Edit: April 27, 2018, 12:58:05 PM by Lisanne »
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Does this bring you joy, calm, confidence  :D  if not, try something else.

https://sewingplums.com - comments on wardrobes, patterns, style, fit
https://uk.pinterest.com/sewingplums/ - style images
https://aimforquality.wordpress.com - good basic sewing techniques
https://easyjackets.wordpress.com - no need for tailoring, unless you want to
https://helpwithsewingpatterninstructions.wordpress.com/2017/03/01/first-blog-post/ - Peggy Sagers sew-alongs
 

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