Author Topic: Finishing double sided wool  (Read 2024 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline EllenD

  • Member
  • Posts: 214
  • Gender: Female
Finishing double sided wool
« on: July 12, 2011, 12:02:46 AM »
I have my eye on some double sided  wool for a fall jacket-- one side is plaid, the other a bright solid.

I'm not sure what the best way would be to finish the lower sleeve edges.  I can do a hand buttonhole in a heavy thread or fine yarn.  Or I can turn one side over to form a contrast hem.

Also wondering what to do at the neck, since I would like some sort of a collar.

Anyone have experience with all of this?

Ellen

Offline Susan in Saint John

  • Member
  • Posts: 1857
Re: Finishing double sided wool
« Reply #1 on: July 12, 2011, 12:23:43 AM »
Sometimes double fabrics are constructed so you can ease the layers apart, tuck the hem/seam allowance in between the layers and then hand stitch or perhaps machine stitch the edge.  Sewing Workshop patterns have some garments where the reverse side of the fabric showing is part of the design.  http://sewingworkshop.com/  They have a pretty good gallery so you might get some  ideas there.  You might also try searching the Threads magazine archives as there have probably been a few articles on using this type of fabric.  Here is an example http://www.threadsmagazine.com/item/16568/the-double-cloth-patch-pocket  This article references another article.

Offline theresa in tucson

  • Member
  • Posts: 1240
  • Gender: Female
Re: Finishing double sided wool
« Reply #2 on: July 12, 2011, 03:42:46 AM »
Ellen, I have a double cloth loden coat that was made in Germany many many years ago.  All the seams were finished with a suede trim (in matching loden green of course) which made it very easy when I went to shorten it this past winter.  It had been languishing in the closet for years since it was too warm as a long coat for our climate.  I saved every scrap of trim and simply reused it.  It was buttery soft and very easy to sew through.  And like Susan said, this cloth could be split.  My coat was not reversable so it had a conventional hem and the sleeves only were lined so the coat would slide on and off easily.  That is something to think about when you make your jacket.  As for a collar, my now jacket, has a hood.

Offline fzxdoc

  • Administrator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 13053
  • I love to sew, pure and simple.
    • fzxdoc's sewing project photos
Re: Finishing double sided wool
« Reply #3 on: July 12, 2011, 08:31:37 AM »
Theresa, you may be interested in looking at this SG topic:

Seaming Techniques in Double Faced Fabrics

HTH,
Kathryn

Offline theresa in tucson

  • Member
  • Posts: 1240
  • Gender: Female
Re: Finishing double sided wool
« Reply #4 on: July 12, 2011, 04:42:43 PM »
Thanks for the link, Kathryn.  I went there and read through the various techniques.  I had it easy in adapting my coat to a jacket since I just copied the hem on the original length after I marked and cut at my desired length. 

Since the coat had been hanging in the closet for so long it had moth holes and I needed to unravel some threads and darn them up.  That worked fine for the outside since it was plain, but the inside was a bright white, green and black plaid with lines of red and blue.  I just darned that with what was available since it was inside the garment.  I added an interior chest pocket made of scraps and copied the same technique used on the welt hand warmer pockets.The attachment for the interior pocket was the armhole side seam (raglan sleeve) and under the suede trim at the front plus a bit of fusible web for security.  That's going to be my dog walking jacket this winter.

 

Gorgeous Fabrics Fabric Mart Fabrics