Author Topic: Folkwear Patterns  (Read 2710 times)

Offline CCL

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Folkwear Patterns
« on: March 02, 2018, 03:30:06 PM »
Since I recently purchased a folkwear pattern, I have been getting their emails again.   It appears that the long-time illustrator- Gretchen Shields - of their iconic pattern illustrations is retiring, after 50 years of doing the drawings for them.   I have only three Folkwear patterns, but now it feels as if I should acquire some of the illustrator's favorites.

Here's the link to her website: Gretchen Shields homepage

And the link to the Folkwear page

I so love the illustrations.

Offline Lisanne

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Re: Folkwear Patterns
« Reply #1 on: March 02, 2018, 04:12:52 PM »
Yes, it will be a challenging feat to find a replacement style of cover illustration as enticing as all those !
Does this bring you joy, calm, confidence  :D  if not, try something else.

https://sewingplums.com - comments on wardrobes, patterns, style, fit
https://uk.pinterest.com/sewingplums/ - style images
https://aimforquality.wordpress.com - good basic sewing techniques
https://easyjackets.wordpress.com - no need for tailoring, unless you want to
https://helpwithsewingpatterninstructions.wordpress.com/2017/03/01/first-blog-post/ - Peggy Sagers sew-alongs

Offline vtmartha

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Re: Folkwear Patterns
« Reply #2 on: March 02, 2018, 07:35:33 PM »
I purchased several Folkwear patterns in the pre internet era.  It never occurred to me they had a website.   Very nice!  I think I might need the Metropolitan Hat Pattern.  ;)

Offline marciae

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Re: Folkwear Patterns
« Reply #3 on: March 02, 2018, 09:33:49 PM »
Oh, Martha - I thought the same thing about the hat!  I never, or very rarely wear a hat, but I sure want that one!??

Offline KarenDee

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Re: Folkwear Patterns
« Reply #4 on: March 03, 2018, 12:47:33 AM »
Thanks for sharing this site with us, CCL. Many beautiful patterns and other items discussed.

Karendee

Offline sdBev

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Re: Folkwear Patterns
« Reply #5 on: March 03, 2018, 06:18:19 AM »
Oh, Martha - I thought the same thing about the hat!  I never, or very rarely wear a hat, but I sure want that one!??
oh yes definitely want that one.   I wear hats in the winter — my ears get cold.
sdBev

Offline Joyce P

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Re: Folkwear Patterns
« Reply #6 on: March 06, 2018, 06:15:35 AM »
I am smitten by the Metropolitan suit! Realistically, it would look like he!! on me, so maybe that hat is a better bet ;-) I don't know, though... just went back and looked at the suit. That jacket!!! Dang!

Offline Garden Girl

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Re: Folkwear Patterns
« Reply #7 on: March 06, 2018, 09:12:18 AM »
I love their patterns. I started getting them in the early 70's. I took a design class from Susan Morrison, I think that was her name, and she was an early wearable arts person. She introduced us to all the wonderful ethnic patterns that were hard to come by yet so fashionable at that time.

One set I loved was the Chinese Jacket and the now OOP skirt pattern. The skirt had front & back lined panels that hung down and pleated sections on the sides. It is shown here with the jacket on the left.

Yes, the Metropolitan Suit is swoon worthy. The Metro Middy Blouse as well. I've had a hat like that; it is a good style. I think my pattern is from Vogue. I liked the Traveling Suit as well.

Offline kushami

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Re: Folkwear Patterns
« Reply #8 on: April 09, 2018, 08:44:16 AM »
I've got two or three Folkwear patterns. I too love the illustrations

On another note, I'd love to see photos/reviews here (or on people's blogs). I know they have a customer photo gallery on the website, but I'm spoiled by the detailed reviews and multiple photos we can get now in a well-written blog post.

Edited to add: Just found CCL's lovely shirt over on the shirtmaking thread:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/104062052@N04/sets/72157692036394761

Also, just visited the website and see it has been revamped with helpful sample photos. They read my mind!
« Last Edit: April 09, 2018, 09:48:31 AM by kushami »

Offline kushami

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Re: Folkwear Patterns
« Reply #9 on: April 09, 2018, 09:44:31 AM »
Just checked my stash. I have the Smoking Jacket and the Tibetan Chupa. I bought the chupa because I like wrap/apron dresses but need darts. The smoking jacket – I'll probably make it for a friend sometime, or maybe me to keep warm more glamorously in my old house.
« Last Edit: April 09, 2018, 09:46:49 AM by kushami »

Offline CCL

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Re: Folkwear Patterns
« Reply #10 on: April 09, 2018, 01:18:17 PM »
Oh, I never looked at the Tibetan chupa until your post Kushami! What a great summer around the house dress that pattern would make.  I wonder how it would be in a shirting cotton?  Probably a little too lightweight.   So many possibilities...it might be great in a woolen to go over sweater and tights.  I might just have to pick that one up... if you end up making it, maybe we could do a Folkwear sew along and see if anyone wants to join us.

I have also been tempted by the Hong Kong cheongsam and the Vietnamese ao dai - sigh, I already have more patterns than I will ever sew.

Offline kushami

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Re: Folkwear Patterns
« Reply #11 on: April 11, 2018, 01:09:00 AM »
Oh, I never looked at the Tibetan chupa until your post Kushami! What a great summer around the house dress that pattern would make.  I wonder how it would be in a shirting cotton?  Probably a little too lightweight.   So many possibilities...it might be great in a woolen to go over sweater and tights.  I might just have to pick that one up... if you end up making it, maybe we could do a Folkwear sew along and see if anyone wants to join us.


Seeing it made up in the nice photos now on the Folkwear site reminded why I thought it would be a good choice. I am going to try to make a test of the skirt today, although the weather here in southern Australia is unseasonably hot this week so I might not get round to it.

I think shirting would be nice, as long as it wasn't see through. And I love the striking print they used for the skirt. My first version will probably be in a nice but boring grey or dark blue linen. Fingers crossed (there are no buttonholes!).

Offline CCL

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Re: Folkwear Patterns
« Reply #12 on: April 15, 2018, 12:03:19 PM »
Kushami, how did your test of the skirt go?   I have settled on the chupa and the Vietnamese ao dai and will be purchasing them today.  I just realized that the three Folkwear patterns I already own were purchased for Better Half (bush jacket and Missouri  River driver shirt) or male friend (French cheesemaker shirt).  These will be the very first ones for me.

I have a number of things in the pipeline because I really intend to finish this year's swap, but it would be fun to interrupt that sewing with a shirting fabric chupa. 

Offline kushami

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Re: Folkwear Patterns
« Reply #13 on: April 16, 2018, 07:10:22 AM »
Kushami, how did your test of the skirt go?


I haven't quite got round to it yet, but hopefully I'll find time in the next day or two. Our only "spreading out" table for pattern cutting is in the kitchen and I seem to have been cooking curry non-stop to use up a big vegie shop. I'll report back as soon as I give it a try.

There is one review on PR in the meantime:
https://sewing.patternreview.com/Patterns/9289

Offline CCL

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Re: Folkwear Patterns
« Reply #14 on: April 26, 2018, 10:31:34 PM »
I ended up ordering the Ao Dai  and the Chupa patterns.   They arrived last week and I just now got around to looking at the instructions for the Chupa pattern.   I have some green and navy striped cotton shirting that I think would be fun to make up in it.   I have a couple other projects in the pipeline before I can get to it, but I keep thinking the Chupa looks as if it would be a great summer dress by itself - wonderful for working in the garden -- and then as a jumper / pinafore in the winter over a turtleneck and tights.

Offline kushami

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Re: Folkwear Patterns
« Reply #15 on: April 28, 2018, 07:10:23 AM »
I ended up ordering the Ao Dai  and the Chupa patterns.   They arrived last week and I just now got around to looking at the instructions for the Chupa pattern.   I have some green and navy striped cotton shirting that I think would be fun to make up in it.   I have a couple other projects in the pipeline before I can get to it, but I keep thinking the Chupa looks as if it would be a great summer dress by itself - wonderful for working in the garden -- and then as a jumper / pinafore in the winter over a turtleneck and tights.

Striped shirting sounds lovely. I am aiming for a plain linen (so I don't have to worry about pattern matching!). I am currently distracted by making a basic wool skirt, but hope to get the kitchen table leaves folded out soon.

Offline CCL

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Re: Folkwear Patterns
« Reply #16 on: June 14, 2018, 10:17:27 PM »
Finished tracing the Folkwear Chupa yesterday.  Hope to get it cut out this weekend.  I am going to make the shorter version.  Hoping it will be a fun and different kind of sewing. 

Offline kushami

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Re: Folkwear Patterns
« Reply #17 on: June 15, 2018, 02:54:19 AM »
Finished tracing the Folkwear Chupa yesterday.  Hope to get it cut out this weekend.  I am going to make the shorter version.  Hoping it will be a fun and different kind of sewing.

Look forward to seeing it! I am going to have access to a large table in a meeting room for a few afternoons soon, and will use the opportunity to trace and muslin a few things.

Offline fzxdoc

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Re: Folkwear Patterns
« Reply #18 on: June 15, 2018, 12:24:19 PM »
Of course I had to see what that Chupa pattern looked like, CCL.


Looks like a fun sew!

Kathryn
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Offline CCL

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Re: Folkwear Patterns
« Reply #19 on: June 16, 2018, 11:26:33 PM »
I am aiming for a plain linen (so I don't have to worry about pattern matching!). I am currently distracted by making a basic wool skirt, but hope to get the kitchen table leaves folded out soon.

Small progress on the chupa...I decided not to worry about pattern matching much even though it's a stripe.  I am thinking with the wrap skirt, it won't make too much difference and the bands are at an angle so can't do much there.  I am about halfway cutting it out, but will have to quit for the evening - will leave the cutting table up.  Here's the oxford cloth striped shirting I am using for this first trial.


folkwear-plus-fabric by CCL photos, on Flickr

Offline CCL

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Re: Folkwear Patterns
« Reply #20 on: June 19, 2018, 12:18:04 PM »
Still very slowly making headway on the chupa in little bits and drabs...lots of stuff going on in real life that is taking priority.  But I did finish cutting out and marking darts etc.  Read through the instructions a couple of times last night.  Hopefully I will be ready to start sewing this weekend.

ETA:  Some notes, Kushami, in case you end up making this.  I stole some time today and stitched in the darts on the front and the front underlayer.  I decided to use the tracing wheel and marking paper to mark the curved darts (usually, I use tailor tacks as I don't like stressing the fabric with the tracing wheel).  But having the exact marking really helped get those curved darts stitched more accurately - at least for me.  Won't be able to sew much on it until the weekend, but glad to have finally put a stitch or two into the fabric and feel as if I am on my way.
« Last Edit: June 20, 2018, 12:31:42 AM by CCL »

Offline kushami

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Re: Folkwear Patterns
« Reply #21 on: June 21, 2018, 08:18:59 AM »
Still very slowly making headway on the chupa in little bits and drabs...lots of stuff going on in real life that is taking priority.  But I did finish cutting out and marking darts etc.  Read through the instructions a couple of times last night.  Hopefully I will be ready to start sewing this weekend.

ETA:  Some notes, Kushami, in case you end up making this.  I stole some time today and stitched in the darts on the front and the front underlayer.  I decided to use the tracing wheel and marking paper to mark the curved darts (usually, I use tailor tacks as I don't like stressing the fabric with the tracing wheel).  But having the exact marking really helped get those curved darts stitched more accurately - at least for me.  Won't be able to sew much on it until the weekend, but glad to have finally put a stitch or two into the fabric and feel as if I am on my way.

Ooh, thanks for the tip on the curved darts – I always struggle with tailor tacks, so I might adopt that method! I try my best to sew them neatly, but by the time I get the pattern separated and go to sew things up, the straggly bits of thread never seem accurate. I have a tracing wheel and some waxed paper somewhere that I've never used so I will have to search it out.

Offline CCL

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Re: Folkwear Patterns
« Reply #22 on: June 21, 2018, 04:12:11 PM »

Ooh, thanks for the tip on the curved darts – I always struggle with tailor tacks, so I might adopt that method! I try my best to sew them neatly, but by the time I get the pattern separated and go to sew things up, the straggly bits of thread never seem accurate.

I learned a trick here at Stitchers Guild in a post by Ann Rowley - now I use embroidery floss for my tailor tacks.  Hope that helps. 

Still, I do like how exact the tracing wheel + waxed color tracing paper worked.  I know the chalked kind is supposedly better and I have some, but the chalk doesn't seem to hang around long enough for me to get the accuracy.

Offline kowgiirl.up

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Re: Folkwear Patterns
« Reply #23 on: June 21, 2018, 04:47:47 PM »
Still, I do like how exact the tracing wheel + waxed color tracing paper worked.  I know the chalked kind is supposedly better and I have some, but the chalk doesn't seem to hang around long enough for me to get the accuracy.

I have the same problem with the chalk. I prefer the tracing wheel with tracing paper or sometimes I use the soap trick that I found here on SG.
Theresa

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Offline fzxdoc

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Re: Folkwear Patterns
« Reply #24 on: June 22, 2018, 03:30:46 PM »

Ooh, thanks for the tip on the curved darts – I always struggle with tailor tacks, so I might adopt that method! I try my best to sew them neatly, but by the time I get the pattern separated and go to sew things up, the straggly bits of thread never seem accurate.

I learned a trick here at Stitchers Guild in a post by Ann Rowley - now I use embroidery floss for my tailor tacks.  Hope that helps. 


For marking using tailor's tacks, I like to use elastic thread because it really grips the fabric (even slippery stuff) and doesn't fall out. You can order it from Nancy's Notions, among other places.



Kathryn
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Offline Debbie S

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Re: Folkwear Patterns
« Reply #25 on: June 22, 2018, 03:54:20 PM »
What a great idea, Kathryn!  My understanding of TT is to use two strand of some sort thread and take a stitch through both pieces of fabric so both TT are in the identical position. Do you do the same with the elastic thread, and still no damage to fabrics?  Have you uses it on silks?

Offline fzxdoc

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Re: Folkwear Patterns
« Reply #26 on: June 23, 2018, 02:49:19 PM »
That's exactly how I make my tailor tacks, Debbie, with the elastic thread. I take one vertical poke through both pieces of fabric, separate the fabric gently so that the elastic thread is lengthened between the two pieces, and snip. That leaves maybe 3/8 inch sticking out on each inside face. I snip the top and bottom lengths to about 1/2 inch or so. No probs with losing any tailor tacks, in chiffon, silk, thin or thick knits or wovens.

Try it and see if you like it. :)

Kathryn
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Offline CCL

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Re: Folkwear Patterns
« Reply #27 on: June 24, 2018, 11:28:41 PM »
Got a lot done on the chupa today. Decided to flat fell the shoulder and bodice side seams... also decided to not topstitch the armhole facings down...will hand catch instead.  Still have the neckband, fiddly button loop and closure, hooks and eyes and hem to do, but feeling productive.  It is a fun sew.

FZxdoc, for some reason, the styling is reminding me of something you might like... maybe it's just the v-ish neckline. 

Took a few phone photos along the way of things that had somewhat oblique explanations in the instructions - if anyone ever needs them.  Hoping to finish sometime next week.

Offline fzxdoc

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Re: Folkwear Patterns
« Reply #28 on: June 25, 2018, 12:06:33 PM »
CCL, I'm looking forward to your rendition of the chupa. Often surplice (criss-cross) necklines do not work well for me--they tend to want to hook under each side of the bust, giving the impression of a mini double bowling ball bag slung over my neck.  ;D ;D ;D  So I usually approach them carefully.

Sometimes, if I like the surplice or crossed neckline style, I sew it closed and put a zipper up the back.

I just know your chupa is going to be wonderful. :)

Kathryn

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Offline sdBev

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Re: Folkwear Patterns
« Reply #29 on: June 26, 2018, 12:02:18 AM »
Ccl
 What Fzxdoc said. 

I may want to make one too but holding off until I see your results.
sdBev

Offline Debbie S

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Re: Folkwear Patterns
« Reply #30 on: June 26, 2018, 03:10:54 PM »
Kathryn, please see if I am picturing the TT correctly. I picture one poke (not an in and out stitch) through both pieces of fabric and then clipped to separate the the pieces of the pattern. If that is correct, it will be more precise than the in and out stitch method I have used.  Thanks!

Offline fzxdoc

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Re: Folkwear Patterns
« Reply #31 on: June 26, 2018, 04:37:57 PM »
If I want to be super precise (like a small dot) , I do one poke with the elastic thread. If I am going along from base to apex of an arrow point, like a match point for a side seam, I do the in and out stitch. In and out of course holds more firmly but can be less precise.

K.
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Offline CCL

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Re: Folkwear Patterns
« Reply #32 on: June 28, 2018, 09:21:18 PM »

Folkwear 131 Chupa on Emily by CCL photos, on Flickr

Haven't hemmed it yet - and I have a bunch of notes for Kushami... in general, I had fun sewing this; working out the instructions was good exercise for my brain. 

Emily is bigger than me and doesn't have the same boney shoulders and shallow chest, so I think if I make this again, I would move in the front band a 1/8 to 1/4 inch in.   I will try to get photos of it on me later.


Sometimes, if I like the surplice or crossed neckline style, I sew it closed and put a zipper up the back.

Kathryn

Kathryn, I think I might try this approach on a future make.  Getting into this dress is almost as much origami as making it!

Edited to Add: I also think if I make this again, I want to figure out how to put in pockets.  Maybe welt pockets on the front of the wrap.

« Last Edit: June 28, 2018, 10:26:25 PM by CCL »

Offline fzxdoc

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Re: Folkwear Patterns
« Reply #33 on: June 29, 2018, 12:07:23 PM »
Oh please add your notes here, CCL, if you have the time. This is, I'm guessing, one of those deceptively simple patterns that turns out to require lots of sewing brainpower and expertise as one gets into the nitty gritty of it.

The clean look of the final garment is inspiring, and it is that, done so cleverly in a stripe, that catches the eye.

As I said on another topic, I like the way stripes tend to do their own thing, as in the neckline trim on this dress. It adds so much visual interest.

Well done, you.

Kathryn
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Offline CCL

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Re: Folkwear Patterns
« Reply #34 on: June 29, 2018, 07:48:26 PM »
Fzxdoc - here are my notes:  I share these mostly because I had a really hard time envisioning how the pattern pieces fit together to make the final garment.  It wouldn’t have mattered much if I were working with a solid, but since I wanted to at least keep the stripes from going crazy, I probably should have constructed a ¼ scale model, but I only thought of that in hindsight. Now that I finished it, everything seems blindingly obvious.  But here's what I jotted down in case it helps anyone else.

This sketch is a simplified version of the completed garment – front and back have the same “skirt” with the extended sides for the wrap around the back.


chupa sketch

 To get into the dress, one steps into the hole (dark part of my pathetic sketch) between the under bodice piece and the dress front. 


Cutting out and pattern matching:
I didn’t worry too much about pattern matching – except to match up the stripe on the under front bodice and the front – after completing the dress, I am glad I did.   I also matched on the bodice side seams (front to back) – both sides.  Other than that, I didn’t worry too much about it – the skirt side seams don’t really need to match.

chupa sketch-01

I mentioned before using the tracing paper for the curved darts.

The button and loop closure is pretty strange.  I followed the instructions, but I think next time I will make the back loop shorter.  I cut an Xsmall and even with that, the back loop starts under my shoulder blade.

Construction:
Pretty much just followed the instructions, though I did flat fell seams on shoulder and bodice side seams and miter the bottom corner of the underbodice – mostly because I like a clean finish.

I found the skirt darts that start at the 90 degree corner where the bodice meets the skirt on each side a little tricky to understand from the markings on the pattern.
chupa sketch-02

 but I ended up chalking a line and using my zipper foot to make sure I lined up the start of the dart with the end of the bodice seam (not sure that makes sense, but here is a photo of the dart which extends down from the side bodice.

skirt dart-labeled

Although the pattern didn't suggest it, I did understitch the armhole facings but I didn’t topstitch them down, just don’t particular like that look, no other reason.  I just handstitched them down.  I also didn’t topstitch the bands. 

Some of the fitting is done with the positioning of the hooks and eyes.  At first I thought I would use snaps instead, but now I can see why it calls for hooks and eyes.  I had to have BH help me figure out placement.  I am still not sure I got it right – but I think I will wear it a bit before I decide to move them.

Writing this up now seems like a "duh" moment, but as I mentioned, it was a good exercise for my brain.