Author Topic: Scuba knit  (Read 8497 times)

Offline sewsy

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Scuba knit
« on: February 10, 2017, 12:04:00 AM »
I'm beginning work on the scuba knit vest, using a  Simplicity pattern I modified to look like a StyleArc design. I am using a ball-point needle and walking foot, sewing slowly, so no skipped stitches.

Working with this material is kinda like sewing on woven rubber. Interesting. There are a few challenges, I'm finding. First, when pressing seam allowances open, the seam allowances leave an imprint on the right side. Therefore I used strips of brown paper bag AND a seam stick. Cotton press cloth and the iron is set to a medium temp. I'd suggest to TEST the iron setting by pressing on a scrap of the fabric before pressing the garment/seam allowances.

Using a primarily dry iron seems to work best, shots of steam are ok, but if the iron steam setting is on high, the fabric seems to take on a lot of water and ripple.

I like the look of the seams once they've been pressed, but this fabric takes on indentations VERY EASILY. I was planning on serging the seam allowances together as well as trimming them, but I think I'll serge them individually; leaving the five-eights width intact.

One other thing I may do, both as a way to keep the seam allowances tame and a decorative element; is to topstitch them on either side of the seam.

It's not a difficult fabric to sew, there are particular things to pay attention to as with all fabrics.

So to recap.

  • dry/small amount of water, iron set on warm temp
  • press cloth
  • brown paper strips under seam allowances when pressing them, use in conjunction with:
  • seam stick if available
  • ball point needle
  • walking foot if available
  • sew slowly

eta. Oops! Sorry! This belongs in the Fabric Review section. Mods, if you would, please relocate this post.
« Last Edit: February 10, 2017, 12:19:04 AM by sewsy »

Offline Debbie S

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Re: Scuba knit
« Reply #1 on: February 12, 2017, 04:32:02 PM »
Sewsy, I recently bought scuba knit hoping to make leggings, skinny leg pants, or pants to get to the gym in our cold Midwest winter.  I had planned on just serging all the seams.....but after reading your post, I wonder if I should reconsider?   Sounds like scuba needs special attention?

Offline sewsy

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Re: Scuba knit
« Reply #2 on: February 12, 2017, 04:39:29 PM »
Sewsy, I recently bought scuba knit hoping to make leggings, skinny leg pants, or pants to get to the gym in our cold Midwest winter.  I had planned on just serging all the seams.....but after reading your post, I wonder if I should reconsider?   Sounds like scuba needs special attention?

Mine did. I'd suggest that you test and see what will work for you. Just serging the seams may very well come out fine.

Offline fzxdoc

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Re: Scuba knit
« Reply #3 on: February 12, 2017, 07:23:13 PM »
I made a scuba knit dress last year and these were my notes from that experience:


Sewing Scuba Knit:

   1. In general, it sews like swimsuit knit. That is, skipped stitches can be a problem.

   2. It is heat-sensitive. I used an organza presscloth and had no problems.

   3. Straight stitch: Ball point needle, size 70. To avoid skipped stitches, slow the machine stitch speed down. (A Mictotex 70 needle skipped stitches 20% of the time and a Universal 70 needle skipped stitches 50% of the time.)

   4. If skipped stitches continue to be a problem with the Ball Point Needle, choose a presser foot that is as narrow as possible. For example, I switched from a 9mm edgestitch foot to a 7 mm edgestitch foot when topstitching next to the piping and the skipped stitch problem went away. Similarly, a single hole plate could help--anything that stabilizes the fabric as the stitch is being made seems to help.

   5. If possible, turn and topstitch neckline and armhole edges. This gives the smoothest finish without ridges that can show from facings. The edges can be stabilized with Steam-a-Seam 2 Lite to prevent stretching out of shape.

   6. Use a 2 inch wide strip of a cool-fuse interfacing like Texture Weft when inserting the hem. Fuse the interfacing (with organza presscloth) at the hem area with about 1/2 inch peeking above the hem edge. Hand stitch the hem into place. With this lofty type of fusible interfacing, the stitches won't show, and neither will "stitch dimples".

   7. Stabilize the shoulder seams with clear elastic.

   8. Make samples!!!

Kathryn
My blog: I Made This! at http://imadethis-asewingblog.blogspot.com/
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Offline sewsy

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Re: Scuba knit
« Reply #4 on: February 12, 2017, 09:57:31 PM »
Kate, thanks for the suggestion about applying interfacing to the hem area. I'll definitely do that. I applied the interfacing at the waist seams where the zippers will be, to be able to stitch the upper seam allowance down without stitches showing. It didn't occur to me to do that for the hem.

Also, I have some clear elastic, and will use it for the shoulder seams. I'd decided that it wasn't necessary since the fabric is a really stable knit, but if you think so, then I will.

Thanks again.  :) :)

eta. Also, thanks for suggestion no.5. I'm reconsidering how to handle the armhole and front/neck edges. I'll post back as to what I come up with.
« Last Edit: February 13, 2017, 09:48:59 AM by sewsy »

Offline Debbie S

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Re: Scuba knit
« Reply #5 on: February 13, 2017, 02:23:48 AM »
I am now dreading working with this scuba knit!!  Sounds like more of a problem than it is worth, in my opinion.

Offline sewsy

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Re: Scuba knit
« Reply #6 on: February 13, 2017, 09:33:35 AM »
I am now dreading working with this scuba knit!!  Sounds like more of a problem than it is worth, in my opinion.

Oh dear. Debbie S, my intention (and Kate's, I'm sure) was not to discourage. Just to help. Scuba knit isn't any more difficult to handle, it's just that it takes a bit more "finesse". But that's my opinion. Please try it. You may find that there isn't any finessing to be done at all. The points I made were simply things I thought one should be mindful of when working with this particular fabric.

The garment I'm working on I am really liking the look of, it's coming out rather well and looks kinda "high end boutique". And that's due to paying attention to how the fabric reacts to being handled. Not to be bragging, of course.  ;) ;D I don't mind the fiddly bits, that's the fun of sewing.  :)

Please give it a try. I think you'll like the results.

Offline vtmartha

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Re: Scuba knit
« Reply #7 on: February 13, 2017, 11:26:25 AM »
I've sewn with scuba knit, Debbie, and found it easy to work with.  I'm not sure I'd use it for leggings though.  The scuba knit I've used has more structure and less stretch than that of my leggings.  Have fun with it!

Offline Debbie S

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Re: Scuba knit
« Reply #8 on: February 13, 2017, 12:52:35 PM »
Sewsy, please do not feel responsible......I always appreciate a heads-up and opinion on any fabric, pattern, and most everything else in life!!  It is just that, I had such quick and wonderful results with  RNL Ponte and SA pants patterns this fall/winter that I was hoping for more of the same with the scuba. I always look forward to your insightful posts.  Please keep them coming!! :)

Offline Debbie S

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Re: Scuba knit
« Reply #9 on: February 13, 2017, 12:57:53 PM »
vtmartha, good point, at second look, the scuba does have less stretch so leggings are not a good choice.  What did you make out of your scuba knit?

Offline vtmartha

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Re: Scuba knit
« Reply #10 on: February 13, 2017, 01:29:51 PM »
I made Christine Jonson's reversible hoodie.  I had purchased a print scuba on a navy background online when they first started showing up and I was surprised to find that the reverse side was white.  I had plans for a cardigan so I found a coordinating solid and made it reversible.

I have another print somewhere that I plan to sew into skinny pants.  I think it will work really well for that as I need pant fabric with some structure.  I've seen many dresses made from scuba which look fantastic but I rarely wear dresses.

Offline Debbie S

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Re: Scuba knit
« Reply #11 on: February 13, 2017, 01:37:15 PM »
Martha, thanks....off to check the stretch of my scuba.  I love skinny pants and would get much more wear out of them than a dress. I could see this fabric in a moto jacket, so that is a possibility

Offline fzxdoc

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Re: Scuba knit
« Reply #12 on: February 13, 2017, 03:40:18 PM »
I actually think that scuba knit is fun to sew on, and I love wearing it! The dress holds its silhouette so nicely, and the fabric is thick enough to smooth over any lumps caused by undergarments.

People comment that it's hot to wear, but I don't feel that. Of course I made a sleeveless dress from it, which is cooler no matter what the fabric.

Kathryn
« Last Edit: February 25, 2017, 01:21:50 PM by fzxdoc »
My blog: I Made This! at http://imadethis-asewingblog.blogspot.com/
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Offline Lisa

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Re: Scuba knit
« Reply #13 on: February 14, 2017, 01:51:21 AM »
I haven't sewn with scuba, but my sister, Liana has.  "Here" is a link to her 2014 blog post on her first experience sewing with scuba.  Among other things, she said that:

Quote
I was pleasantly surprised to find that the fabric was a dream to sew.  It's got body galore, and pretty much did whatever I wanted it to.  No ravelling, no 'squirming' around, it just stayed put.  It did require understitching on the collar and front edges. I used Pam's Pro-Tricot Fusible Interfacing on the collar and the lapel point areas, and that was all the interfacing it needed. 

HTH,

Lisa

Offline Marniesews

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Re: Scuba knit
« Reply #14 on: February 25, 2017, 04:59:26 AM »
I've found scuba very easy to sew with and I'd suggest the solution to skipped stitches is not to use either ballpoints or microtex - I used stretch needles (Schmetz 103/705H Stretch are my preference but Organ,Klasse, Prym should be fine too) and was able to stitch along at normal speed without any skipped stitches at all on both my sewing machine and overlocker. In all respects I sewed it like nylon or cotton lycra, no pressing at all and using 1/4" seams.

I even used it for a couple of juvenile ballroom dresses, although I do prefer lycra for that.

The one on the stand is a latin dress with just a single circle skirt but the one on the left has a 2-circle ballroom skirt. Clearly both have more body that a plain lycra skirt would.
 
« Last Edit: February 25, 2017, 05:15:30 AM by Marniesews »
Pfaffs, Berninas and Jukis - so much fun! If only I had time I might stick some rhinestones on them that have fallen off the dresses! :D

Offline Debbie S

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Re: Scuba knit
« Reply #15 on: February 25, 2017, 11:13:12 AM »
Marniesews, thank you.  I certainly have plenty of the Schmetz stretch needles on hand and prefer 1/4" seams so this info is really helpful.

Offline sewsy

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Re: Scuba knit
« Reply #16 on: November 02, 2017, 10:04:02 PM »
I'm working with the scuba knit again. This time it's for middle DD. Got the pieces all cut out, had to squeeeeze them onto the 1.5 yards I had that was for a different project. I began by making the welts for the pockets, then onto the back pieces. I forgot that the fabric takes marks easily, should've took a look here at the first post  ::) ::) but after getting manila envelope strips (had to use them doubled for each side this time) and pressing and repressing the back and seam allowances about seven times, the seams finally look ok.

I was at the ironing board longer than I was at the sewing machine. It's a moto jacket, Butterick 6169.

The pattern is designed for wovens and calls for a lining that initially I wasn't going to insert. However, since I've "found"* a knit that I think will work, I'm going to try and see how it'll look.

*There was a bit of an avalance of fabrics that fell from a shelf in the emporium, and among them was a black knit that made me think: "hmmmm....might work..." when I gathered it up off of the floor.  ;D ;) :)



Offline DaisyChain

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Re: Scuba knit
« Reply #17 on: November 12, 2017, 02:53:14 PM »
Sewsy, clearly the black fabric wanted to come home with you!

Last summer I bought some scuba fabric. Not quite sure what I was thinking but there it sits in my stash, 2 metres of pale lilac scuba. I must learn not to click the ‘Add to Basket’ button!  ::)

So pleased I found this thread with lots of great advice on how to sew it. Now I just need to figure out WHAT I’m going sew. Any suggestions?

Offline andib

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Re: Scuba knit
« Reply #18 on: November 12, 2017, 05:00:30 PM »
Your idea of scuba for a motojacket made me think that it might work for a structured vest.  Im trying to figure out how to use all my sub and poly knits, but I need casual layers