Author Topic: Lagenlook  (Read 116929 times)

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Offline blue mooney

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Lagenlook
« on: July 07, 2012, 12:26:55 AM »
Francis Grimble mentioned lagenlook on another thread and I had to google to see what that meant. Now I'm intrigued. Many of these outfits look like they could be put together from Marcy Tilton, Sewing Workshop and Cutting Line patterns. Some of the Vogue Woman patterns that had me scratching my head make a little more sense, too.

My question - is anyone wearing this look where you live? I kinda like it, but I'm not a fearless fashionista.

Offline shams

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Re: Lagenlook
« Reply #1 on: July 07, 2012, 01:26:49 AM »
Some version of it, for sure, Robyn. I first learned of the Lagenlook description last year and blogged about it. That post is one of my most visited.  ;)

I feel that I wear a version of lagenlook, as do many of my friends. I do not favor, as a rule, large voluminous tops, because they tend to make me look larger, though I like the look on others.  I own many lagenlook clothing pieces that I wear.

If you search "lagenlook" on ebay, you will find a wealth of treasures.  Some lagenlook designers I do not like as well, for example, Magnolia Pearl and Krista Larson, are not my particular aesthetic.  I love Hebbeding and La Bass, as well as many others.

Barbara de Jounge, who recently passed away, designed lagenlook pieces using wool felt, and pieced sweatering.  I mention her passing on my blog (scroll down).

Offline Terri K

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Re: Lagenlook
« Reply #2 on: July 07, 2012, 01:48:12 AM »
 I've seen numerous versions of this genre - there are many silhouettes as Shams said.   The many layered, voluminous pieces make us small ladies look like we're wearing a parachute or hiding in there someplace.   That's not my look.    Nor am I into the 19th century New Orleans brothel look that the layers of lacy ruffled bloomers, chemises and corsets the Magnolia Pearl ladies cavort around in connotes to me.   

I really don't think the current independent pattern designers are going for the voluminous, oversized looks these days.     I think we all have to sew and wear what we feel comfortable going out in public.    I don't want people to notice how weird my clothes are, or think I'm wearing a costume.   I just want to be well dressed for my shape and the occasion and place I'm in.
« Last Edit: July 07, 2012, 01:51:26 AM by Terri K »
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Offline Meg

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Re: Lagenlook
« Reply #3 on: July 07, 2012, 01:52:03 AM »
Those styles are not being seen where I live (Vermont).  I almost like them but they don't quite suit my lifestyle.  While I am tall, the many layers/sheer volume just don't fit into any part of my life. 

Offline shams

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Re: Lagenlook
« Reply #4 on: July 07, 2012, 01:55:43 AM »
I agree, Terri.  And I want to add that I wouldn't personally wear any of the outfits, as shown in your post, Robyn.  I think it takes a tall statuesque woman with a certain aesthetic to pull that off. 

I'll wear a pair of lagenlook pants with a more fitted knit top, such as a Miyake origami T.  I'll wear an Au Bonheur tunic with funky tucks over leggings. I'll wear lagenlook shoes such as Trippens.  That is my sort of lagenlook.

Offline luz clara

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Re: Lagenlook
« Reply #5 on: July 07, 2012, 02:20:52 AM »
In San Diego, especially at the university I have seen lots of versions of lagenlook outfits. Mixed in with surfing outfits, high end outfits, and other outfits. A look that is really popular is sheer skirts or dresses with capri-length leggings underneath. Also I see lots of great shoes, but there is no place in San Diego that sells Trippens that I've been able to find!

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Offline NancyDaQ

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Re: Lagenlook
« Reply #6 on: July 07, 2012, 02:23:45 AM »
I don't think I would wear any of those examples as complete outfits. But, I could imagine wearing pieces of them with more mainstream clothing or modified to something less extreme. In fact I have a Coldwater Creek top that this a modified version of the white tunic, and you don't get much more mainstream than that

Offline FrancesGrimble

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Re: Lagenlook
« Reply #7 on: July 07, 2012, 02:35:44 AM »
I've been told that "lagenlook" literally means "layered look." That said, I think of Krista Larson and Magnolia Pearl, and the Victorian-Edwardian inspired styles in general, as more boho than lagenlook.  I don't think of them as risque.  IMO you need to consider the difference between a marketing photo and the way you could wear the garment, just as with many photos in fashion magazines. (I have seen fashion photos like one with a woman wearing a conservative navy business blazer--open, with nothing whatever underneath it. I'm sure no one wore it that way to the office.)

To me, lagenlook means garments with clean simple lines, especially in natural fibers. In photos of garments for sale on eBay, I have seen outfits with many layers--a tunic over a shirt, and over a skirt as well (maybe over two skirts of different lengths), then a long drapey sweater of yet another length on top of it all. This is the extreme.  I think it would take a tall person to carry it off, but I have never seen a living person wear that much at once, and maybe they don't. Photos like that do make it easier for eBay sellers to market several items in their inventory at once . . .

However, I can and do wear things like a loose linen jumper over a shirt, and maybe over a skirt as well, which is also lagenlook. Also, the garments can range from really, really big on you to just, not super-fitted. Again, I think eBay sellers go to extremes in their photos--they probably just pile the garments onto whatever plastic mannequin they have regardless of whether anything actually fits the mannequin.

I have seen garments I'd call lagenlook in books of Japanese sewing patterns, worn in a non-extreme way. Or at least, even when very large as some are, they are not photographed with too many layers.

Lagenlook designers I've seen on eBay include Completo Lino, Hebbeding, La Bass, Martine Samoun, Cynthia Ashby, Flax, and Bodil. I like some of these more than others.

XCVI Wearables (not a boutique brand, I see their clothes in department stores) manufactures a fair number of lagenlook-type styles.

There's also Homefrocks (www.homefrocks.com) but they might be classified as boho.  Homefrocks, Krista Larson, Magnolia Pearl, and Martine Samoun often like to use very thin fabrics. In addition to being more comfortable in warm weather, these reduce the bulk of the style considerably. And of course you can wear an opaque slip under them.

Ewa i Walla is a boho or a lagenlook designer, depending on your terms--they are another frilly designer. See:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Ewa-I-Walla-Lissy-Cardigan-Mole-L-/110897652392?pt=UK_Women_s_Jumpers_Cardigans&hash=item19d203e2a8

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Ewa-i-Walla-Nanette-2-Layer-Skirt-Rust-Extra-Large-/110897653339?pt=UK_Women_s_Skirts&hash=item19d203e65b

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Ewa-I-Walla-Fabienne-Thick-Cotton-Poplin-Coat-M-/110896490777?pt=UK_Women_s_Coats_Jackets&hash=item19d1f22919

Here are two online stores that sell lagenlook and boho clothes:

http://shopartichoke.com/designers.html

http://www.2chicboutique.com/

And an Etsy/small-business designer:

http://www.etsy.com/shop/sarahclemensclothing?ref=search_shop_redirect

If anyone here does dyeing--I have had very good results dyeing Completo Lino 100% linen garments--even the thread dyes. Krista Larson clearly dyes at least some of their garments after making them. I have bought garments on eBay where the dye was streaked vertically from the elastic waists, as I found out after I bought the garments. Guess that's why they were deep-discounted on eBay.  I have overdyed some Krista Larson cottons successfully, but their cotton broadcloth garments don't overdye well.  They should, but my results are always blotchy.  I can't figure it--my guess is Krista Larson uses broadcloth with a finish on it that prewashing with Synthrapol does not entirely remove. XCVI's 100% cottons dye very well, including the thread.

« Last Edit: July 07, 2012, 04:39:54 AM by FrancesGrimble »

Offline shams

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Re: Lagenlook
« Reply #8 on: July 07, 2012, 02:58:02 AM »
Yes, Nancy, there is a range and people use lagenlook pieces and mix it up.  I own pieces from La Bass, Hebbeding, Eskandar, Oska, Ivan Grundahl, Completo Lino, Flax, Dress to Kill, Barbara de Jounge, Rundholz, Kedem Sasson, Zuza Bart, Comfy USA, Simpli, Itemz, Blanque, Transparent, Peter Mahler, Babette, Mycra Pac, Porto, Alembika.  There are others I look at, but don't own.  For example, I don't think I own anything by Shirin Guild or Lilith.  Not that I can recall.

While Lagenlook technically means "layered" I've seen lagenlook looks that aren't layered, so the term has morphed somewhat.  A woman in England wrote me once to tell me that she coined the term to describe the clothing she was selling.  That may be, I don't know.

Offline indigotiger

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Re: Lagenlook
« Reply #9 on: July 07, 2012, 03:52:46 AM »
If langenlook means layered, then perhaps my personal style is a version of that (never thought there was a name for how I dress...), at least in the cooler weather, when multiple layers are highly functional, especially in an underheated cottage. My standard garb in all but the hottest summertime is a pinafore/jumper over something, usually a dress, with the hem of the dress showing along the bottom. As the temperature drops, I add leggings, sometimes a knit top under the dress, a vest and/or a shawl, and always hats of various styles. (examples here, and here, and here)

While I almost always make my own clothes, I once had two cherished dresses, one from Flax and one from Bluefish, that were worn until the linen literally wore away to nothing... The information here about designers has given me many places to look for inspiration. Whoot! My clothing is highly idiosyncratic, but it is both comfortable and never fails to garner postive comments from passers by.  Of course, living in Portland OR, the city where you can buy bumperstickers that say "keep Portland weird", my clothing is not at all the oddest things seen as streetwear in these parts.
« Last Edit: July 07, 2012, 03:57:31 AM by indigotiger »
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Re: Lagenlook
« Reply #10 on: July 07, 2012, 04:24:48 AM »
I haven't seen anything like that here either, but fashion here tends toward tank tops and flip flops.  :D

Offline FrancesGrimble

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Re: Lagenlook
« Reply #11 on: July 07, 2012, 05:13:53 AM »
If langenlook means layered, then perhaps my personal style is a version of that (never thought there was a name for how I dress...),

Of course, living in Portland OR, the city where you can buy bumperstickers that say "keep Portland weird", my clothing is not at all the oddest things seen as streetwear in these parts.

Yes, I think you wear a version of lagenlook.

I live in San Francisco, where you can wear ANYTHING.  (Even nothing. There's a local nudist group known as the "naked guys.") I've been used to wearing historic and to some extent, folk-inspired clothes as much as I can all my life, so to me, there's nothing odd about it.

Offline bessiecrocker

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Re: Lagenlook
« Reply #12 on: July 07, 2012, 08:51:31 AM »
In German speaking Europe lagenlook is pretty much standard attire. This is German ebay, just so you can see more (not particularly high-end) examples: lagen

Lagen is German for layers. It's sometimes called the "onion look." Terri's Tosca dress is totally lagen style...proving that you can wear this even if you are small. Marcy Tilton patterns are also very lagen style.  Indigotiger's style would be right on the streets here, too. The German versions rarely have all the frills and flounces that BoHo style uses.

Yesterday I saw a woman on the street who I'm sure was a high fashion model (maybe retired, because she was close to age 40, perhaps.) She was Black (not a native European!), more than 6 foot tall, very elegant, and moved exactly like a model. She wore "lagen"...a very long loose full black skirt, with a Tilton type tunic out of black textured sheer material, some sort of plain black shirt, and a black head band.

Lagen in the summer suits European weather...it's much cooler and damper here than in most parts of North America. Our weather is more like San Francisco or Oregon. And natural fibers are part of the European "green movement"...people really prefer clothing that is not synthetic. 
« Last Edit: July 07, 2012, 09:36:12 PM by bessiecrocker »
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Offline Garden Girl

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Re: Lagenlook
« Reply #13 on: July 07, 2012, 11:56:08 AM »
BlueMooney, are you psychic, or what? You knew I was going to log on today and start a Lagenlook thread! Yes, Lagenlook and Boho types are occasionally sighted around here, although the great unwashed masses go more for overly tight t's, tanks, jeans, leggings and those horrid DasieMae shorts ::). And tattoos. I am horribly under tattooed for this market. The over 60 crowd dresses the same, except for the shorts, and also one still sees plenty of polyester pull on pants and poly camp shirts.

Bessie ThankYou for the German E-bay link; I've spent the last hour drooling and now it's really late. Yikes-3am! I saw stuff I covet, dresses perfect for Janice, Jumpers for Indigotiger, a jacket like one Shams made.

Last year when Shams blogged about Lagenlook I finally had a name, other than eccentric, for the look that I like and that works for me. I don't actually mind if people think my clothes are odd/weird, I would wear most of what BlueMooney posted-well, not the white tunic. I adore what Magnolia Pearl does, but honestly, I dressed that way when I was 20. Real Victorian and Edwardian chemise, bloomers, petticoats as skirts, all that. I was the "odd girl" in Junior High and High school wearing lots of vintage, so I relate to garment choices that Frances talks about. And I'm tall. At 5' 8 1/2", especially in heels, with broad square shoulders, I could carry off more dramatic clothing fairly well. COULD. Not so much now. Cannot wear heels and I've plumped up rather well over the years. So I feel dorky in a lot of stuff anyway. Let's face it; the Magnolia Pearl type garments work on the models she uses, with the great manes of hair in their own little tribe out on the farm in Texas. On middle aged plump women, not so good. And you'd (I'd) feel like a total idiot wearing that to the grocery store. Unusual garments are definitely easier to carry off if your friends also wear similar garments, like the Advanced Style ladies. They rock, but even they don't wear it to work.

All that said I think Lagenlook is ideal for a wardrobe if you are losing weight. Much of it is one size, covering 3 or 4 sizes, sometimes more. I think a lot of the styles would be good for at least 30 lbs., maybe as much as 50 or 60 lbs. Pull the drawstring tighter, add another pleat or tuck.

Rene

Offline blue mooney

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Re: Lagenlook
« Reply #14 on: July 07, 2012, 12:00:25 PM »
Wow, count on you all for lots of information and references! Shams, I'll be sure to go back to that post on your blog. I bet all the comments will make for interesting reading, too.

Fran, thanks so much for all the links! Like NancyDaQ and Shams,  I'll be more likely to use a single piece paired with something more mainstream, or incorporate some touches or details that I like. .All those sites you linked to will give lots of ideas.

Terri, you're right, I think I had the older styles from the indie patterns in mind.

I'm trying to figure out exactly what is appealing to me about the style. Partly the natural fabrics and textures, to be sure. And I like the fabric manipulation - the tucks, gathers, bands and all.

Indigotiger, I guess I need to go visit Portland! Your outfits have a historical/folk vibe to me. I think that's part of the appeal, too.
Rene, you bring up the vintage angle. Natural-textured-folk-vintage; these are all elements I like, brought together under one term.

Well, it will be a happy linky morning for me! Lots to go look at.
« Last Edit: July 07, 2012, 12:23:18 PM by blue mooney »

Offline Hermelin

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Re: Lagenlook
« Reply #15 on: July 07, 2012, 12:26:11 PM »
oh boy, this is funny
you two really set a good mood for my day.
i have mended my computer, that is why my keyboard is a bit unfunctional.

If langenlook means layered, then perhaps my personal style is a version of that (never thought there was a name for how I dress...),

Of course, living in Portland OR, the city where you can buy bumperstickers that say "keep Portland weird", my clothing is not at all the oddest things seen as streetwear in these parts.

Yes, I think you wear a version of lagenlook.

I live in San Francisco, where you can wear ANYTHING.  (Even nothing. There's a local nudist group known as the "naked guys.") I've been used to wearing historic and to some extent, folk-inspired clothes as much as I can all my life, so to me, there's nothing odd about it.

Offline bessiecrocker

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Re: Lagenlook
« Reply #16 on: July 07, 2012, 12:47:19 PM »
good morning America! Just to let you know, you don't need to look towards Europe for this fashion trend. Look at Eileen Fischer clothing...she's done this for years. most everything on this page could be lagen

The major points are simple geometric lines, natural fabric with lots of texture, and multiple, very thin layers.

Also, I need to tell you that it's a bit of a cliché that lagenlook is especially popular with fat women. Finding plus size (or petite, for that matter) clothing in Europe is not as easy as it is in the USA.  There are specialized stores that sell lagenlook in large sizes.

mta: corrected spelling. note to self: do not multi-task in multi-languages.
« Last Edit: July 07, 2012, 09:38:50 PM by bessiecrocker »
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Offline reanns

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Re: Lagenlook
« Reply #17 on: July 07, 2012, 04:16:06 PM »
Good Morning all!  It's always so neat to learn something new.  I clicked on this subject as I didn't know what lagenlook meant.  Knew I heard the word, couldn't remember in what context.  And now I know!  Interestingly, one of the links FrancesGrimble posted yesterday was for Artichoke - a store I frequented when I lived in Wilmington, NC - wondering the entire time how they managed to stay in business in the land of Lilly Pulitzer!  But that's the store I found my first pair of Trippen's and over the years I did buy a few pieces from here - all very expensive.  What's funny is that I was looking at Pinterest this morning and 'liked' a new Eileen Fisher layered outfit and then sat and thought to myself...'why do I really like her designs when I look at them and when I try them on, I never do?'   Anyway, all that said (I'm rambling) another place for this type of clothing is Kati Koos in San Fran.  Her Facebook page changes daily with all kinds of lagenlook-type clothing. 

Offline blue mooney

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Re: Lagenlook
« Reply #18 on: July 07, 2012, 05:56:01 PM »

Also, I need to tell you that it's a bit of a cliché that lagerlook is especially popular with fat women.

Eeew. I hate to be a cliché. I hate being fat, too, but that is not so easily fixed.

Offline FrancesGrimble

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Re: Lagenlook
« Reply #19 on: July 07, 2012, 06:22:56 PM »
The German versions rarely have all the frills and flounces that BoHo style uses.

I think that is one key difference.  If you have a simple tunic in a plain color and with little or no trimming, it's lagenlook.  If you have the same tunic in a printed fabric and/or with feminine trimmings, it's boho.  Of course, boho can be *very* funky and/or frilly but there is definitely overlap with the lagenlook styles.

Offline FrancesGrimble

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Re: Lagenlook
« Reply #20 on: July 07, 2012, 06:32:22 PM »

Eeew. I hate to be a cliché. I hate being fat, too, but that is not so easily fixed.


I'm very short and I'm not fat, and I wear lagenlook and boho styles. I think the key is to keep it toned down. At least by my standards--highly conservative people might think *everything* I wear is extreme. I don't wear my clothes really huge and swampy, and I don't wear tons and tons of layers.  In the local (foggy, damp) climate, most people often wear a certain amount of layering anyway. But as I got middle-aged, I moved away from super-fitted clothes (except for historic costumes with such fit), and also from high heels, pantyhose, and other things I had hated but endured for the sake of fashion.  I focus on wearing what I like and if that is not in fashion, or if someone thinks a petite is not supposed to wear it--who cares.

Offline FrancesGrimble

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Re: Lagenlook
« Reply #21 on: July 07, 2012, 06:43:06 PM »
Anyway, all that said (I'm rambling) another place for this type of clothing is Kati Koos in San Fran.  Her Facebook page changes daily with all kinds of lagenlook-type clothing.

It's odd, I live in SF and have been to Kati Koos, but I never thought to look for them on Facebook until you mentioned it.

The clothes at Kati Koos are phenomenally expensive. Many of the designer lagenlook/boho clothes are expensive.  I am not saying they are badly designed or low quality, or that the stores that sell them have poor collections or bad service. But when I buy them, I buy them on sale or discounted on eBay. (I have bought several garments from Sarah Clemens, the Etsy seller--her prices are reasonable, her quality is good, and she is great to work with.)  As for the rest, those simple garments are really easy to sew up.
« Last Edit: July 07, 2012, 08:34:22 PM by FrancesGrimble »

Offline shams

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Re: Lagenlook
« Reply #22 on: July 07, 2012, 07:03:05 PM »
I think I introduced you to the KatiKoos facebook page, ReAnn.  ;)  She also has wonderful newsletters you can subscribe to.  There are many boutiques with web presence and I enjoy looking at their clothing, as well as visiting brick and mortar stores and trying things on.

Offline joan71

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Re: Lagenlook
« Reply #23 on: July 07, 2012, 07:14:38 PM »
I think I introduced you to the KatiKoos facebook page, ReAnn.  ;)   
Me too!  In fact last winter I bought, from a FB posting, and had shipped one of the citrine sweater type tops.  Paid a fortune for it, but love, love, love the color and wear it with one of Marcy's pants (also an influence by shams and jillybe).  ;)

Offline Pina

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Re: Lagenlook
« Reply #24 on: July 07, 2012, 07:24:07 PM »
Like Bessie said,people in Europe have been wearing Lagenlook,or layered clothes for many years.Susann Di has been selling iron on lagenlook patterns for some years.All her patterns have a 1 cm seam allowance.

Natur zum Anziehen,(Nature to Wear),has been selling Lagenlook patterns for some time too.

I wear layered look clothes,due to our weather,but no Lagenlook clothes.Not the same,but I feel similar like Alison in this article.I got rid of half my wardrobe,stopped coloring my hair,gave up wearing makeup and felt - I could revive clothes I had loved in the past and hadn't been able to bear to throw away.  :D

Offline FrancesGrimble

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Re: Lagenlook
« Reply #25 on: July 07, 2012, 07:43:26 PM »
Like Bessie said,people in Europe have been wearing Lagenlook,or layered clothes for many years.Susann Di has been selling iron on lagenlook patterns for some years.All her patterns have a 1 cm seam allowance.

Thanks, I will look at the German patterns.

I discovered Krista Larson, Magnolia Pearl, Completo Lino and the other designers on eBay years ago. There is one British seller with several eBay IDs. She uses some IDs to sell plus sizes, and some to sell regular lagenlook. I am probably on the lowest end of the body size that can wear lagenlook. I'm wearing tunics as jumpers, and I have to alter most of my purchases. So I avoid some of her IDs, but that is where I learned the term lagenlook. I don't think she coined it. Given the German lagenlook movement, I suspect they coined it. 

It's not all thin fabrics--medium-weight linen is also popular, especially for tunics and jumpers.

I bought a very elaborate, ruffly skirt from that eBay seller, which is probably more boho than lagenlook. When I received it, it weighed a ton. I discovered what had not been clear in the listing--it was three separate skirts sewn together at the waist.  All made of medium-weight natural-colored linen and with their own ruffles!  I took it apart to make three skirts and dyed two of them in different colors.

Another popular feature, which shades into boho, is what I'd call "unnecessary seams," except that sounds pejorative and I don't mean it that way. A loose pattern is cut up in places where that is clearly not useful for fit, or for anything except the ornament of having a different seam.  Obviously you can do this with a pattern that was not already designed that way. Using different fabrics for a more obvious patchwork look shades into boho. But in lagenlook sometimes the pieces are on different grains, though sometimes not. Sometimes they are symmetrical on the garment, and sometimes not.  BTW, one of the things I like about lagenlook is that the styles are often asymmetric.

Here is a garment with "unnecessary seams" (though I don't wear lagenlook pants, they are too huge):

http://www.ebay.com/itm/CYNTHIA-ASHBY-Linen-A-Line-Diagonal-PANT-Canvas-Large-NWT-/150851223175?pt=US_CSA_WC_Pants&hash=item231f6efe87

and more:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/CYNTHIA-ASHBY-Current-Fabulous-THATCH-Linen-Tunic-Cream-Large-NWT-/160838458563?pt=US_CSA_WC_Shirts_Tops&hash=item2572b81cc3

http://www.modcloth.com/shop/blouses/saturday-stroll-top

Speaking of what makes lagenlook, see:

http://www.modcloth.com/shop/dresses/flight-for-your-right-dress-in-maxi

If this were in a homey printed or striped cotton and did not have a racerback, I'd think "Krista Larson!" on first seeing it.
« Last Edit: July 07, 2012, 08:27:58 PM by FrancesGrimble »

Offline Karendee

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Re: Lagenlook
« Reply #26 on: July 07, 2012, 08:29:47 PM »
Finally, a topic that I am quite familiar with. Yes, I do buy quite a few of the pieces from most of the brands Shams and others mentioned, although I mostly order online, when traveling  or even in dept. stores. Flax and Eileen Fisher can be easily found here in my local department stores. Frequent trips to Fl , Wrightsville Beach NC, and other places offer small independent stores with tons of Blanque, Babette of SF , Trippens, and Larson clothing. I get a daily update from Kati Koos and a few other shops on FB. I purchase quite a bit of clothing from Fawbush online and another vendor in Blowing Rock, NC area. I have quite a few favorites, but I enjoy wearing these clothing pieces in a simple, unlayered way. My body type doesn;t layer too well and the climate where I live is often humid and hot. I also find quite a few things in Vogue, SW, Cutting Line Designs, the Ericson Sisters, Marcy Tilton, and other independent  pattern makers allude to this style of clothing.

The beige outfit with turban and long layers might garner looks on the street here, but my area is not known for a trendy on the street population, to answer your question. But you will see items here and there to flirt with some of the trademark looks. It's nice that sewists especially can mix and match from different styles within our wardrobes. Enjoy it all.

Karen
« Last Edit: July 08, 2012, 08:01:59 PM by Karendee »

Offline FrancesGrimble

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Re: Lagenlook
« Reply #27 on: July 07, 2012, 08:55:27 PM »
I don't actually mind if people think my clothes are odd/weird, I would wear most of what BlueMooney posted-well, not the white tunic. I adore what Magnolia Pearl does, but honestly, I dressed that way when I was 20. Real Victorian and Edwardian chemise, bloomers, petticoats as skirts, all that. I was the "odd girl" in Junior High and High school wearing lots of vintage, so I relate to garment choices that Frances talks about.

I've loved vintage, historic, inspired-by, and upcycled secondhand styles since I was 16, so my taste hasn't changed a lot.  Really, the lagenlook is relatively new for me except, once again, I am gravitating to the boho aspects.  I just quit giving up wearing the clothes I like when they were not in fashion. Yes, when I was in my twenties I appeared on the street in thin, original camisoles and drawers. I've quit exposing as much, but why not wear an original Victorian petticoat, dyed or white?  It's more modest than a pair of shorts or a miniskirt--both styles I have really, really hated all my life and always refused to wear.

Although I've never been enamored of the 1940s to early 1960s styles currently in fashion, I do like it that so many people are making different versions of vintage, boho, and lagenlook clothes. I get many ideas from designer sites, online boutiques, eBay, Etsy, lots of places. I want every garment to look special somehow--when it comes down to it, I don't want to make anything really plain.  BTW, I don't see any need to have a public idea site like Pinterest. I have a couple of huge three-ring binders--one for tops, and one for dresses and skirts. I stuff into these whatever gives me an idea--images printed from websites, pages clipped from print catalogs, and drawings of my own.
« Last Edit: July 08, 2012, 03:51:34 AM by FrancesGrimble »

Offline SnugglesMom

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Re: Lagenlook
« Reply #28 on: July 07, 2012, 09:38:52 PM »
Lagenlook means layered look. When I hear it, I as a German think of someone simply wearing layers. As in a dress over pants and maybe something over the dress.
I layer pieces all the time, because I find it can make old things new and I can really mix up my wardrobe.

However, the Lagenlook pictures you posted remind me of fashion from the German new Hippie, Eco friendly scene. A friend of mine wears this and she usually pairs wide harem pants with boots, one or two long shirts or dresses and a cardigan, usually knit, as well as a hat.

Offline bessiecrocker

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Re: Lagenlook
« Reply #29 on: July 07, 2012, 09:50:05 PM »

However, the Lagenlook pictures you posted remind me of fashion from the German new Hippie, Eco friendly scene.

Here, I grabbed something quick to show New Hippie style. http://www.7trends.de/trendshopping-new-hippie/  To me New Hippie is more retro-70s revival. I'm old enough to have worn "hippie" the first time around. I would not wear the "new" version...too old. My DD wears it, however.  It's a younger person's style.

 Lagenlook, on the other hand, can be worn by most any age group. Frances is totally right about the "unnecessary seams" aspect. The layering can use any weight fabric, but the trend is usually to mix weights and textures. In winter the fabric is heavier than summer.
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Offline FrancesGrimble

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Re: Lagenlook
« Reply #30 on: July 07, 2012, 10:05:14 PM »

However, the Lagenlook pictures you posted remind me of fashion from the German new Hippie, Eco friendly scene.

Here, I grabbed something quick to show New Hippie style. http://www.7trends.de/trendshopping-new-hippie/  To me New Hippie is more retro-70s revival. I'm old enough to have worn "hippie" the first time around.

That site is not what I'd call lagenlook, as an American. It strikes me as rather like this very trendy store:

http://www.anthropologie.com

There are certainly some Anthropologie styles that strike me as neo-hippie, but I am not sure their wearers think of them that way.  For example:

http://www.anthropologie.com/anthro/product/shopnew-clothes/25377045.jsp




Offline lessalt

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Re: Lagenlook
« Reply #31 on: July 08, 2012, 12:24:15 AM »
This is such an interesting post. I have a few pieces in this classification but they are pricey so I always do a little computation in my head - how much fabric could I buy for the same amount of money? The last couple of years I've been making clothes a little closer to the body but I still love individual pieces so that I can mix it up.

Although we have three nice women's clothing shops in the rural area I live in, they are a little conservative.. Occasionally I buy pieces online but I get stumped when it comes to shoes. I've become acquainted with the Trippen brand through the postings of Shams and Margy. I'd like to find other brands in this genre. Any recommendations?
Leslie

Offline FrancesGrimble

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Re: Lagenlook
« Reply #32 on: July 08, 2012, 12:50:08 AM »
Another boho, layered-look designer, whose dresses look a bit closely fitted in the bodice for true lagenlook:

http://iveyabitz.com/2012summer/

I love their styles, fabrics, and colors, I really do, it's just . . . their prices.  And they only custom make clothes, so I never see them discounted on eBay.  I've never custom made clothes for anyone, nor do I want to. If I did, considering all the hand finishing I do, I'd charge up the wazoo.  So I don't blame Ivey Abitz, but I can't justify paying $400 and up for a skirt I could make myself.

I was looking on this site for the Cydwoq shoes they used to carry, which struck me as similar to the Trippen, but Ivey Abitz no longer carries them. But, here is the manufacturer's store:

http://cydwoq.com/womens.html

This website carries Cydwoq plus a number of similar brands:

http://www.pedshoes.com

None of these really appeal to me. They're huge and clunky. I love wearing ankle boots, but not something so heavy looking as these boots and shoes.

« Last Edit: July 08, 2012, 03:55:30 AM by FrancesGrimble »

Offline margyh

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Re: Lagenlook
« Reply #33 on: July 08, 2012, 02:43:19 AM »
Oh, Leslie, I feel like I am turning another sewing friend on to crack...  ::))but go on here for Trippens, Cydwoq, etc., and [url=http://www.solestruck.com/search-womens-shoes/]]here [/url]
« Last Edit: July 08, 2012, 02:46:08 AM by margyh »

Offline bessiecrocker

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Re: Lagenlook
« Reply #34 on: July 08, 2012, 09:19:12 AM »
More eye candy. This is a Swedish company that's very popular in Germany. gudrunsjöden That's their UK site, but you can switch the country to USA, etc. at the top.

I looked at some of the other links. The frilly styles are NOT seen in Germany. It's a bit more of a French look, IMO. So I went to French sites to see if I could find sewing patterns. All the patterns that I came up with were from Japanese sources! So this style must be a trend in Japan...

You don't really see the layered look in Italy. The Italians prefer their clothing cut closer to the body.

Another point that identifies this style is that the cut is often asymmetric. Sewing Workshop patterns would be good to recreate this style.

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