Author Topic: Embroidery Frame/stands  (Read 2916 times)

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Offline JuneBug

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Embroidery Frame/stands
« on: February 19, 2012, 03:02:40 PM »
I am interested in purchasing (actually pointing out to DH for my birthday gift next month) a frame/stand for handwork that will leave both hands free and am looking for suggestions or specific product recommendations.  I embroider mostly and am interested in doing more applique- no cross stitch.  I think that an adjustable floor model would be best.  I'm not sure about a hoop versus a scrolling frame.  The idea of a scolling frame makes me think that it would be less stressful on fabrics, but I wonder if I would get the required all around tautness that a hoop provides.  I've been contemplating some rather large area projects and have put them off because I just don't get the right amount of control when I'm trying to stitch and support the work at the same time.

What do you think?

Offline sdBev

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Re: Embroidery Frame/stands
« Reply #1 on: February 19, 2012, 04:12:50 PM »
Junebug
Years and years ago, I used to do a lot of needlepoint on the scrolling frame. No I didn't not get all around tightness.  I also needed to exercise care in placing my stitches and how tight the stitches were or I would warp the piece (not the scrolling frame but the work itself). At least once I warped it so badly I couldn't pull it back into shape!  But applique could be different. 

I

Offline AnnRowley

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Re: Embroidery Frame/stands
« Reply #2 on: February 20, 2012, 09:44:23 AM »
I prefer a scrolling/slate frame. I don't like the size limitations imposed by a ring/hoop frame, nor the marks that it makes on the fabric.

You do have to do some initial work; sewing the edges to the tape and, most importantly, wrapping the sides, but for a large piece of work it's worth the half hour or so that this takes.
If this is done correctly you should have no problems at all with warping.


Offline Lisa

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Re: Embroidery Frame/stands
« Reply #3 on: February 21, 2012, 04:02:07 AM »
Has anyone tried the Millenium Embroidery Frame?  I've seen an interesting video demo, but have never talked with anyone who's actually used one.  Apparently it can only be ordered from the UK...
Ann, do you have an opinion?

Lisa 
Found: a favorite silver bracelet that I hadn't seen for a while.  On its four quarters it says "Welcome Introspection; Accept Wisdom; Seek Illumination; Embrace Innocence."   It's like a "magic 8-ball" on the wrist...

Offline JuneBug

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Re: Embroidery Frame/stands
« Reply #4 on: February 21, 2012, 08:51:33 PM »
Ann, I do like the option of a scroll frame, and with all the time invested in a project, proper preparation time isn't a problem and would probably be made up in time saved using a frame rather than struggling with a hoop like I have in the past.

Lisa, I really like the simplicity of that frame. I am seriously considering it.  Shipping it to Alaska is half again the cost of the frame, but shipping costs are something I have simply accepted as a cost of living here.  I am fairly handy and I'm sure that I can build a stand to support it.  It seems to have positive reviews.



Offline AnnRowley

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Re: Embroidery Frame/stands
« Reply #5 on: February 22, 2012, 10:40:31 AM »
Lisa, I've just looked at the video - I've not seen nor used this frame.

Thoughts -
You would need to be very accurate when pushing the fabric into the slots that it was absolutely on grain. I see this is a problem especially with canvas.
It's vitall that the side of the fabric is lashed to the side bars so that tension is evenly applied. As shown the sides would flap. ;D
So... in my entirely personal opinion I would not waste money on this frame.

The correct term for 'Roller' frame is actually 'Slate' frame. They come with lots of different variations; some tighten the side bars with a screw, others need cotter pins. I have both..
But they all have a tape on the roller to sew the fabric to, and strong side bars for lashing.
Attaching the fabric is called 'Dressing a slate frame' - google that to see lots of ideas.

This is a rather long-winded one that I came across.

Offline AnnRowley

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Re: Embroidery Frame/stands
« Reply #6 on: February 22, 2012, 12:23:05 PM »
I am reminded by a frame made by my mother some forty years ago that a good frame needn't cost much.

                       
 This is simply four pices of 1" x 1" wood butted at the corners, which are stabilised with angle irons.

I stitched firm ribbon round the edges of the canvas and stapled it to the frame, matching centres.
                       
 As you can see the work has stayed completely square.

You only need to be able to use a saw and a screwdriver...

A couple more photos here

Offline Lisa

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Re: Embroidery Frame/stands
« Reply #7 on: February 22, 2012, 07:08:10 PM »
Ann, thank you for the voice of reason (I clearly needed to hear it).  And the link to details about how to dress a slate frame. ;)  My local needlework shop usually frames up canvases that you buy from them--since I'll be moving away from them, I've been thinking about how to do it myself. 

For some reason, I hadn't thought of doing it myself that way. (Why not, can't say...)

Again, thank you!

Lisa
Found: a favorite silver bracelet that I hadn't seen for a while.  On its four quarters it says "Welcome Introspection; Accept Wisdom; Seek Illumination; Embrace Innocence."   It's like a "magic 8-ball" on the wrist...

Offline sdBev

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Re: Embroidery Frame/stands
« Reply #8 on: February 23, 2012, 02:40:08 AM »
Interesting Ann, and quite lovely.  I thought that Junebug was looking for stand/frame which is a little more complicated.  I loved having a stand that was bent down and formed in such a way that I could sit on it.  That allowed me to use both hands in my stitchery my "seat" holding the frame in place.  Perhaps I was oft track in my suggestions because that's what I was visioning from her question.

Offline JuneBug

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Re: Embroidery Frame/stands
« Reply #9 on: February 27, 2012, 06:21:27 PM »
I greatly appreciate all the advice, and will be taking some time to wrap my brain around all the options available. 

sdBev, you were correct. I am actually looking for a system that is a stand that supports a frame independently allowing me to work with both hands free.  It doesn't need to be fancy, just functional.

Ann, thank you for posting about your mother's frame.  Sometimes the simple answer is best.  I think that I will start with that for my next project with a basic frame size.  If I ever need to accommodate a very odd sized project, it won't be that difficult or expensive to make a custom frame.  (I never thought to sew a ribbon or other stabilizing material to the edges and always wondered how the work was attached without ruining the work fabric.   ::))

In reading some of the links provided, I've seen quite a few different stands.  I think I would prefer a floor stand rather than one you sit on as I like to sit on the edge of chairs and change my position quite often for my back.  I will definitely need one that allows relatively easy access to the backside of the work.  There are various stands with clamps that would work well with Annís frame, such as the Edmundís Stitch Master, but Iím not sure how easy accessing the back is.  There are also stands that simply support the frame allowing the frame to be flipped over at will, such as the Daylight Stitch Master.  Does anyone have a preference or advice about the pros and cons of either or both of these types of stands.  Iím leaning toward the Daylight stand.

Offline JuneBug

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Re: Embroidery Frame/stands
« Reply #10 on: October 03, 2013, 08:10:29 PM »
I thought I would update. An elderly friend, who has no family, passed away a couple of weeks ago.  Over the past few years she has given me several boxes of fabrics and trims (with a few questionable surprises thrown in there :o). We have been sorting her belongings for a garage sale and among her things were several types of frames including round hoops, PVC hoops, wooden scroll frames, square frames, and the original version of the Grace Company hand quilt hoop frame (with a missing leg board).  The last one has a 24" hoop, so I will likely either purchase or make a smaller hoop for it for smaller projects. I was able to purchase them for a generous garage sale price, but still far less than new/retail/shipping to Alaska. I look forward to trying out all the different frames and will think of my friend and the times we spent together as I use them. 

Offline crashnquilt

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Re: Embroidery Frame/stands
« Reply #11 on: October 04, 2013, 01:48:07 PM »
If you contact the Grace Frame Company, they may be able to replace your missing part.

Offline JuneBug

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Re: Embroidery Frame/stands
« Reply #12 on: October 07, 2013, 01:02:01 AM »
crashnquilt:  I contacted the Grace Frame Company.  The model is no longer made and they were able to direct me to some information on their site that shows the piece.  I should be able to make one easily.  I spent 30 minutes last night removing barely started projects from the many frames- none of them were of any interest to me.

Offline jodiwell

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Re: Embroidery Frame/stands
« Reply #13 on: October 09, 2013, 02:18:31 AM »
Hi Junebug,

I am glad you found a solution and what a fitting home for your friend's embroidery stand.

I thought I would share what I use.  It accepts all manner of hoops and frames, is lightweight and very adjustable.  I have dupetren's contracture in my left hand, experience a lot of cramping in both and this solution has allowed me to keep doing handwork. Hope this helps someone else!

Edmund's craft stand

Jodi

Offline Merl

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Re: Embroidery Frame/stands
« Reply #14 on: October 22, 2013, 05:03:15 PM »
What an informative thread to stumble on.
A couple of years ago I rescued something from the curb that had been left out for garbage pick up and was never quite sure what its purpose was.
It was made by the Leclerc loom company but, I was not able to find any reference to it on their web site.
Not knowing just what it would be called I didn't give much time to a general internet search either.
It is just a two legged stand that is connected with two crossbars and at the top of the legs there are what must be called 'stretcher bars' with a pair of opposing ratchets at their ends and thick wooden dowel rods cross connecting the stretcher bars to each other to form take up rollers.
These take up rollers have a wide strip of heavy canvas fastened to them so as to attach a textile project and be able to advance the work and keep it under tension much the same as on a loom.
I always thought that it would be good for something but, I was never sure just what.
 
 

 

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