Author Topic: Woodworking!!  (Read 3185 times)

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Offline MelissasHusband

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Woodworking!!
« on: January 28, 2012, 03:17:06 PM »
I'm just sayin'....

If you've mastered making three dimensional stuff from patterns using a floppy, stretchy, ravel-ly, fabric, think of how easy it would be to make three dimensional stuff from plans using a rigid, non-drapey, non-stretchy material like wood.  So, you saw instead of sheer, you glue instead of stitch.  I'm amazed how much of the mindset translates between the two.

I've been a woodworker http://steve68steve68.blogspot.com/ for many years, and like sewing, there's a lot to learn.  But also like sewing, a few basic tools, some determination and planning, and you can really make a lot of stuff.  Also like sewing, the more you do it/ learn, the more ambitious your projects will be and the better your results.  The required personality and motivations for sewing and woodworking are identical, as far as I'm concerned.

I guess as a man who's taken up sewing, it's incumbent upon me to try and encourage the largely female population here to think about making some sawdust.


Zalin

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Re: Woodworking!!
« Reply #1 on: January 28, 2012, 04:37:42 PM »
MelissasHusband, my husband is also a woodworker so the tools are available to me. I have often helped him and have gotten pretty good with the compound miter saw. :)

I'm very interested in woodworking as a hobby and am inspired by this blog. http://ana-white.com/

Right now my biggest obstacle is time. There's just not enough time for all the hobbies I am interested in. What in your opinion is the biggest obstacle for women who are interested in woodworking?

Offline Elona

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Re: Woodworking!!
« Reply #2 on: January 28, 2012, 05:20:56 PM »
I have made quite a few smallish things like bookcases of various types and bathroom vanities (dh is taller than average), and my experience of obstacles is that it does take some experience to learn to use the power tools safely and well (got a serious scar or two that way), but the biggest thing for me was that big plywood sheets are simply difficult for a smallish woman to move around.

Offline rratstarr

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Re: Woodworking!!
« Reply #3 on: January 28, 2012, 06:30:47 PM »
If you've mastered making three dimensional stuff from patterns using a floppy, stretchy, ravel-ly, fabric, think of how easy it would be to make three dimensional stuff from plans using a rigid, non-drapey, non-stretchy material like wood.

I've often thought that!  Especially one day after explaining to a gentleman in line in front of me at the cutting counter that fabric is not sold by the square yard, but by the linear yard, and the widths vary; and the materials can also change due to shrinkage from regular laundering!

That said, I am at a time in my life where I need to pare down my hobbies rather than acquire new ones.

Offline cheetah

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Re: Woodworking!!
« Reply #4 on: January 28, 2012, 08:26:42 PM »
  The required personality and motivations for sewing and woodworking are identical, as far as I'm concerned.


Ahh, something I've suspected. Woodworking has appealed to me for a while, though like others, I probably don't really need another hobby. Still...

Offline Ann

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Re: Woodworking!!
« Reply #5 on: January 28, 2012, 09:38:19 PM »
DH does renovations and we both talk about how some things are similar - measure twice, cut once, grain and straight edges, and finishing techniques. He actually made the small crown moulding for our ceilings. I am hoping he will get into other projects once the house is finished.

When I taught school, we found the girls who had done 3 years of sewing did great in woodworking classes. They understood about the details and need to work carefully to have a great looking project. The teacher was blown away when the girls said they learned that in sewing. He, on the other hand, couldn't get the boys to do that kind of work and if they took sewing, they had to learn about it fast if they wanted to survive in my classes. 

I would love to do wood as my father was a finishing carpenter but I do not need another hobby. I will leave that hobby to DH. Unless I kill the stash and then I might consider it. Until then, I won't.

Ann
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Offline MelissasHusband

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Re: Woodworking!!
« Reply #6 on: January 29, 2012, 04:29:27 AM »
What in your opinion is the biggest obstacle for women who are interested in woodworking?
Seriously: probably stigma.  Because it's a "man thing" women might be inclined to think there really ARE some obstacles specific to their gender when there really aren't.  But they've probably never visited THIS website: http://womeninwoodworking.com/wiw/Gallery.aspx

I might say upper body strength if I weren't aware of a HUGE number of small/ weak/ old/ disabled men who are actively woodworking.  Yeah, you might not be able to pick up a 3/4" thick sheet of plywood (4' x 8'), but neither can a goodly number of men.  There are always work-arounds.  Less convenient perhaps, but gets you to the goal.  I'm a big guy who started sewing.  Does anyone here think I can't do it because my hands are too big to thread a needle or something?  You no more need to be strong to woodwork than you need to be dainty to sew.

Safety is key, obviously.  And frankly, IME, careful, methodical, detail-oriented, patient, etc.  -the temperament and personality that best suits woodworking - is more naturally prevalent in women than men anyway.  Men IME are more likely to rush, take risks, bite off more than they can chew, get frustrated, etc. than women, and THAT is what gets you hurt.

Apologies for sexist generalizations if they offend anyone.

Many assume a big barrier to entry to woodworking is space, and money (for tools).  While not entirely untrue, it usually has more to do with the person than the space/ tools.  I've met guys who've cranked out heirloom-quality repro furniture with a few yard-sale hand tools working - literally - on a bench set up as a kitchen island.  On the other side, there are plenty of guys out there with a three car garage stuffed to the gills with every industrial machine there is and they're challenged to make a simple birdhouse.  Creativity/ "eye", planning, problem solving...

Offline BetsyV

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Re: Woodworking!!
« Reply #7 on: January 29, 2012, 01:46:33 PM »
With our projects, we are usually more involved in using heavy power tools and not the finer tools, such as hand planes etc. We renovate our apartments when necessary, we rarely get involved in small cabinetry projects. But this does remind me that there is a thread case in progress for me  ...

I am not a small woman, but my hands aren't big enough to hold the 10" circular saw and operate the power switch with that same hand.  The 7" circular saw isn't powerful enough for the materials we use, often. The belt sander weighs at least 15 pounds at rest. I can use it but my hands tire very quickly (wrist problems), and I lose control of it. I am, frankly, terrified of the table saw, although I will stand at the other end and receive the cut pieces. The work benches tend to be a just a bit too tall for me to comfortably get my shoulders above the work and control it. I am 5'4", not terribly short, but I find standard counter heights to be just a bit tall for me. I like the power drills, the miter saw, the diamond tile saw, the smaller nail guns. The biggest nail gun is too heavy for me to use for any length of time, especially if I have to hold it up over my shoulder height. I like the routers just fine, and the biscuit joiner, and the random orbital and palm sanders. The sawzall is awesome, but the hammer drill is a bit cumbersome after a while.

Plus, this kind of work ruins my hands for sewing.

Offline ejvc

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Re: Woodworking!!
« Reply #8 on: January 29, 2012, 03:39:32 PM »
I've done some woodworking and enjoyed it.  My current obstacles are basically living in a small flat.  Sewing does not generate as much dust as woodworking and therefore can be done in the living room.  My husband eventually objected to the sawdust and I didn't do very much at all.  But when I have a bigger space I will be getting a few more tools.  Also I don't have a car.  Wood is a lot heavier than fabric and can't be mail ordered.

I was a little put off by needing to have an enormous machine to plane things to even thicknesses, also.

Meanwhile I also prefer hand tools to power tools -- but I also do a lot of hand-sewing.  I agree the they are similar though.

Elizabeth
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Zalin

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Re: Woodworking!!
« Reply #9 on: January 29, 2012, 06:06:15 PM »

Many assume a big barrier to entry to woodworking is space, and money (for tools).  While not entirely untrue, it usually has more to do with the person than the space/ tools.  I've met guys who've cranked out heirloom-quality repro furniture with a few yard-sale hand tools working - literally - on a bench set up as a kitchen island.   

My husband made our bed frame (30 years ago) out of 4x4's and 2x8's using a hand saw, a hand planer, and an electric drill. It is one big heavy piece of clunky furniture (not exactly heirloom quality) and I love it. We lived in an apartment at the time so he worked outside in front of the door.

Fortunately, now he has electric-powered tools and we have a house and a garage, so it would be a lot easier if I decided to do some woodworking.  :)

I'm going to look at the link you provided and get inspired. :)

Offline Back2Sew

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Re: Woodworking!!
« Reply #10 on: January 29, 2012, 07:30:24 PM »
What a great topic! In my visits to fabric shops and attendance to sewing shows I have noticed a link between sewists and woodworkers. Most of the married women I speak to have spouses who are woodworkers. My guess is about 75%. In fact, I have often wondered why the sewing/quilt shows don't team up with the woodworking shows to give shows in the same area at the same time. Can we start a poll on to find out if there is a link between woodworking and sewing? 

Offline blue mooney

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Re: Woodworking!!
« Reply #11 on: January 29, 2012, 10:28:39 PM »
The difference between woodworking and sewing is in the cutting. You can't ease a piece of wood if you cut it too big or stretch it if you cut a little too small. Neither can you hide your cutting boo-boos in the seam allowances.

I've done some minor stuff - I make my own panels and frames for artwork. My greatest obstacle is the Spouse, because he will always do stuff for me rather than have me messing around with his tools. All I have to do is say that I'm going to go out and cut something, and he'll immediately say, "I'll do it." I have always wanted a lathe to turn bowls, and have a nice set of tools, but no lathe yet.

I do enjoy finishing/refinishing projects and think I'm pretty good at that.

eta - as far as sewers and woodworkers teaming up, I think that people who make things enjoy the company of other people who make things. Also, we understand each other's needs for the proper tools and materials.
« Last Edit: January 29, 2012, 10:32:19 PM by blue mooney »

Offline MelissasHusband

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Re: Woodworking!!
« Reply #12 on: January 29, 2012, 10:55:46 PM »
The difference between woodworking and sewing is in the cutting. You can't ease a piece of wood if you cut it too big or stretch it if you cut a little too small. Neither can you hide your cutting boo-boos in the seam allowances.
Totally with a wink, but, "sure you can!!"

A common technique in woodworking is to make something INTENTIONALLY too big... so it sits "a little proud." It's then either hand planed or sanded flush.  It is FAR easier to "flush" something in place than to hit it exactly dead-on right off the saw.  Dovetails (the triangular-ish "finger" joint often seen joining drawer fronts/backs to sides) are almost ALWAYS cut with the tails too big, then flushed by hand after assembly.

Also, probably would be frowned upon by heirloom perfectionists, but among boat builders in particular, the "scarf joint" is the way you lengthen a board.  Interestingly, wife and I saw a King Tut exhibition which included some furniture found in the tomb.  I was surprised to see a scarf joint in a piece of wood in a chair.  The piece was only a foot or so long - I can't imagine why they wouldn't just make/ use a longer piece.... for the king/god.

Lastly, I've heard the saying "a good woodworker isn't one who never makes mistakes, it's one who knows well how to hide them."  While a "serious" woodworker may turn his nose up at wood putty, there's all manner of "decorative" buttons, butterflies, infills, plugs and patches that are fair game.

Not trying to be a contrarian- just sayin'.   :)

I'll admit I'm a little surprised (well, not really, I guess) at the high % of women responders who ARE interested in woodworking.  Maybe only the interested ones are replying.

Offline Elona

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Re: Woodworking!!
« Reply #13 on: January 29, 2012, 11:49:44 PM »
The women in my woodworking class were-with one notable exception, a gun-toting former lady Marine--all people who sewed.

Offline blue mooney

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Re: Woodworking!!
« Reply #14 on: January 31, 2012, 12:13:11 AM »
[
Lastly, I've heard the saying "a good woodworker isn't one who never makes mistakes, it's one who knows well how to hide them."  While a "serious" woodworker may turn his nose up at wood putty, there's all manner of "decorative" buttons, butterflies, infills, plugs and patches that are fair game.


We stitchers do that, too. Mistake = design opportunity.

Offline grandrivergirl

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Re: Woodworking!!
« Reply #15 on: January 31, 2012, 06:24:20 PM »
A friend and I took a woodworking class at our local high school.  They had all the fancy tools and even a gizmo that sucked up all the sawdust into a hole in the floor.  I need one of those!
You get to use their tools, teacher's expertise and aren't stuck with a lot of expensive equipment you need to store.  I recommend it.
I made a TV table, a plate rack and a thing shaped like a flat whale with pegs to hang coats on.  My friend spent her ten weeks on a solid pine blanket box that was beautiful.

Offline ManWhoSews

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Re: Woodworking!!
« Reply #16 on: February 22, 2012, 05:58:03 PM »
Made a lot of sawdust myself!  It is fun working with wood, very flexible, workable and I'd say I'm about 50/50 on thread waste/scraps and sawdust.

One of the coolest projects I created was a wine glass/cocktail glass cabinet in my kitchen wall. I made the door from recycled wood and sandblasted glass panes, had 4 glass shelves made, had a friend install a light with a dimmer, so it is another light source for the area as well.  It is really a nice addition and everyone who sees it thinks it's pretty cool.

Have made lots of picture frames and panels to paint on (for art) and some sculptural stuff as well.

But when it comes to furniture, I let others do the work.  :P    I just don't have the right tools and I REALLY don't need another hobby!   ;D

Offline chek101

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...
« Reply #17 on: February 26, 2012, 05:38:50 AM »
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« Last Edit: March 17, 2012, 03:47:19 AM by chek101 »

Offline Ann C

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Re: Woodworking!!
« Reply #18 on: February 26, 2012, 08:41:42 AM »
I'm another frustrated woodworker!  When I was in high school - back in the 50's -  girls were allowed to take a semester of wood shop and I gobbled up the chance!  I made a coffee table and end tables from the formica cut-outs from when the tops were cut out for the kitchen sink.  I put wrought iron legs on them and they were the tables I started out our marriage with.  DH was a woodworker and through the years, he acquired lots of tools and now has quite a full workshop.  I turned over the woodworking to him and became a seamstress instead!  He has done quite a bit of renovations to our home and has built me a series of sewing rooms, each time making it bigger.  He no longer is able to do much with his woodworking (he is 81 and I'm 72), so I guess I'll never be able to fulfil my dream of working with wood!When taking that wood shop, we had access to lathes and I wanted to make one of the turned bowls, but there just wasn't enough time to do it.  I remember the steps they took in glueing the wood strips together to get the pieces big enough to turn.  It was really fascinating to watch.  As you mentioned, there are many similarities between sewing and woodworking.  Any wonder why we are attracted to the people we marry!

Offline judith

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Re: Woodworking!!
« Reply #19 on: February 26, 2012, 04:36:42 PM »
When our oldest was first out on his own, he wanted to make some furniture but since he was just out of university, in a new city, he didn't have the tools or shop space. So he signed up for an evening woodworking class where you could pick your project. That way, he had access to top notch tools, and some guidance from a person with experience. Something to consider for those who find themselves in similar circumstances at the other end of our careers.

And I agree, there seem to be a lot of us sewers who are hooked up with woodworkers. I certainly don't have the creative talents of my husband, and he's an excellent resource when I'm planning a project, especially when it comes to putting colours together. I, on the other hand, like to just hang out in his shop because of the lovely smell of wood.
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Offline Laurie H

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Re: Woodworking!!
« Reply #20 on: August 06, 2012, 07:26:05 PM »
This is an old topic, but I just found it.  Guess I wasn't looking earlier.  Thought I'd toss in my two cents.  I've routinely gotten my own power tools for Christmas gifts.  I don't often make things, but I do use them to make home repairs or to actually finish something around the house.  My DD and I built a closet in the laundry room.  My DS and I laid the tile floor in the laundry room and bathroom.  I can do a lot of things I never pictured myself doing.

I do love wood, everything about it.  I've done a lot of finishing and refinishing of furniture.  My DMIL taught me a lot, since she did it for years.  She also loves woodworking.  She never had a lot of time for it, she raised 5 kids (4 of them boys) and she worked full time outside the house and had a huge garden.  She had to limit herself to refinishing and recaning chairs for the most part, but she did love woodworking. 

My hubby has lots of different tools, I can use most of them, but I have to admit that some of the bigger ones make me nervous.  Probably because they are kind of  high for me to use and/or heavy.  I like smaller tools that fit my hand and aren't quite so heavy so my arm doesn't get tired.  I know they can be dangerous if I'm not careful.  DH and both want to do some serious...for us...woodworking.  DS has made some things and they're nice.  He made me a really pretty quilt rack.  He loves working with wood and he's very good with wood. 

Luckily, DH, DS and DD are all good with colors, so when I need their eyes, they'll look over my fabric selections for a quilt when I'm stumped and they'll tell me what to toss and what to keep or how to switch what I have to make it all work.  They've never been wrong. 
Laurie H

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Offline HappyGene

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Re: Woodworking!!
« Reply #21 on: November 02, 2012, 03:36:06 PM »
Wow, I'm a sewist/woodworker, too.  What an awesome connection for a topic.  I appreciate everyone's well-stated observations.

About the harder, more abrading, work altering the skin on our hands: I've taken to wearing gloves (and using work-arounds so I can leave them on) most of the time and following a strict lotion regimen.  I've found that lotions having some type of glycerin and/or stearate listed _before_ the mineral oil work better at keeping my hands softer.  It doesn't help all the way as I need to use the rubber studded finger tip grippers with some fabrics, but it makes a real difference.  That's a little strange since glycerin and/or petrolatum combinations are also used as drying agents.  I don't fully understand the dual nature of these.

At one point, it became difficult to match textures of fabrics and I knew I needed to change something.  I at first thought that my skin was just drying out because I'm entering my 50's (which IS a small part of it all,) but then I noticed that my fingertips and parts of my hands were the most affected and I knew I'd have to mitigate the effects of wood and mechanical working.

As an example, after washing my hands and drying, but before they really get thoroughly dry, I'll lotion up - even if some moisture work around the house like moving clothes from the washer to the dryer is coming up soon.  After each chore where my hands are dampened and I dry them, I'll use lotion, again.  I keep a pump bottle at each sink and in the garage.

Also, like after a long bath or cleaning the sinks and bathroom with rubber gloves; if I let my skin dry directly from the shriveled prune-state without lotion, it toughens slightly.

To me, it's important for the wookworking, too; because when my skin is really dry, I can't feel the feathers of raised grain or the flush of an edge, for example, on a piece of wood unless I pull my sleeve up and use my wrist or the back of my hand.  For awhile, I had to keep some synthetic satin or microfiber handy to drag on the wood to see if it pulled and rake a credit card across a joint to check the flush.

My finger tippy-tips seem to toughen the quickest and I have to alternate between working them down with a stone and peeling them if the callouses build up.  Honestly, it's great for playing guitar, but troublesome for sewing and typing (I'm usually scanning servers and need to type amongst various keyboards by touch.)

:) Gene
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Offline Madrona

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Re: Woodworking!!
« Reply #22 on: November 02, 2012, 03:53:27 PM »
I would love to learn woodworking.  Err... I would love for my husband and me to learn woodworking together.  ;)

I had been drooling over this Rockler Sewing Cabinet for a long time, and then I found one made from this exact plan on Craigslist for $150 (here is a pic of it opened and closed).  I was so excited to find it, and I really do LOVE my sewing cabinet.  Except.  My machine is too big to fit through the hole.  :-\  So I wonder if I could modify this cabinet to work.  Cutting a new hole in the existing top would work, except then I would either not be able to put my knees under the desk any more, or I would not sit in front of the needle; probably the former.  Really what I need to do is make the entire desk wider by about 6-8" ... but at that point, I may as well make a new cabinet.   Hence the desire to learn woodworking.   ;D

Offline judith

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Re: Woodworking!!
« Reply #23 on: November 02, 2012, 04:52:45 PM »

I guess as a man who's taken up sewing, it's incumbent upon me to try and encourage the largely female population here to think about making some sawdust.

Nope. Not a chance.

As part of our retirement planning, my husband built me a perfect sewing studio, and then we had a huge wordworking shop built for him. Over the years, I acquired all the sewing related toys I wanted, and he did the same with high end tools. He was a journeyman carpenter, but moved on to pencil pushing a long time ago, and his love for woodworking grew as he didn't have to earn his living that way.

Anyway, way back when we were both working, we each spent all of our free time in our respective studios. My mother used to say "no wonder they get along so well, they never see each other".

Now that we are both retired, I enjoy the me time I get in my studio, and I'm sure he feels the same about his. When we spend time together, we always have something to talk about and enjoy being together. But I wouldn't want to be in each others pockets 24 hours a day.

So, although I admire the talents and products of woodworkers, I have absolutely no desire to learn that skill, and I don't want him to invade my sewing space, either.
Most people are as happy as they allow themselves to be. (Abraham Lincoln)

Offline rratstarr

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Re: Woodworking!!
« Reply #24 on: November 02, 2012, 06:10:04 PM »
I'm glad this thread was bumped today, because I found a project that encompasses both sewing and woodworking: plans for a tailor's board:

http://www.chance-of-rain.com/2012/diypt-no-5-tailors-pressing-board-free-pattern/

Offline Ann C

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Re: Woodworking!!
« Reply #25 on: November 03, 2012, 11:02:37 AM »
One word of caution that you may not need if you read that specific part - be sure to use a hardwood - the "whiter" the better and the "harder" the better.  Soft woods have too much sap still in the wood and when you press with heat and steam, the sap can come out on your garment and stain it.  Hard rock maple is probably the best and what I'm pretty sure the June Tailor boards are made from, though there are other woods that would be great.

A friend of mine borrowed mine to make a pattern and her DH made her one of pine - it made a mess on the suit she was making.

DH made me a long pant board (like a sleeve board but much longer and wider) and he used something else - we couldn't find maple and it worked fine.  I'll ask him in the morning to be sure.  There is a picture of it in my sewing room pictures.

Offline tania-gru

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Re: Woodworking!!
« Reply #26 on: November 03, 2012, 11:07:30 AM »
would beech work? Fairly hard light coloured  wood with a small grain? It is widely available here in Denmark, as we have tons of beech forests
Tania

Offline Ann C

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Re: Woodworking!!
« Reply #27 on: November 03, 2012, 11:25:07 AM »
Tania,

I have no idea really.  What we did was buy a piece of wood and before DH started cutting it out, I tried pressing on it with steam and a press cloth.  That should tell you.  It shouldn't raise the grain too much if it is a really hard piece of wood.  I wish DH would wake up - he will remember because he knows his woods.  I do know that beech is a really light colored wood, so that is in its favor - just need to make sure it doesn't still have any sap to speak of.

Offline spookietoo

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Re: Woodworking!!
« Reply #28 on: January 06, 2013, 12:13:30 AM »
When I purchased my home 14-15 years ago, I of course envisioned hours spent making drapes, roman shades, re-upholstering my furniture, etc. Unfortunately the 1970's excessively tacky formica leg supporting the "L" in my kitchen counter top greeted me with its hideous appearance each day as I returned home. Not only was it UGLY, the 20 cubic feet of wasted storage space under that counter top mocked me! Needless to say, its demise became my top priority.

Numerous trips to Lowes & Home Depot resulted only in my determining that I was even too poor to afford the cheapest, most poorly made junk cabinets either had to offer. They were made out of MDF, cheap stapled butt joints, ugly doors, were still going to cost me several hundred dollars, and would have to be "remade" in effect to overcome a quirky dishwasher location and to get the cookbook storage I needed. I was almost ready to give up on the idea of new cabinets and just hang a curtain around the base, when I accidently came upon the 4' x 8' sheets of MDF and they only cost $10 each! I was designing, selling and project managing restaurant kitchens installations at the time, so my brain quickly calculated I would only need 2 sheets of MDF, a couple of 2x4's, and some 1x2 poplar for the face frames - I was certain I was under $150 - paint included! Borrowed my bros' table saw and the rest is history! Anyone that does woodworking is probably cringing at the thought of MDF in a kitchen, but the rest of my cabinets are also MDF and are still very structurally sound at 30 years of age.

I've always enjoyed sewing more than knitting as I get more bang for my buck (more stuff to enjoy vs the amount of time spent creating it). But I have to say that woodworking is as enjoyable as sewing - except you get dirtier - can't say I like that part so much - que sera sera.

I'll try to post some pics of my kitchen cabinets when I get better at this positng stuff (and after they get their 15 year overhaul this spring - Out with the old Italian look - in with ????? Still finalizing some details....)

Guess what I'm saying ladies is don't knock it till you've tried it. Woodworking is very rewarding!
-Tina

Zalin

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Re: Woodworking!!
« Reply #29 on: January 06, 2013, 03:43:12 AM »
spookietoo, I don't think any one here was knocking woodworking. On the contrary, we all have a very positive opinion of it.  ;D

Offline spookietoo

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Re: Woodworking!!
« Reply #30 on: January 06, 2013, 03:56:23 AM »
Zalin - just using what is in my area of the country "don't knock it til you've tried it " a light-hearted colloquialism.   8) (OMG! I spelled colloquialism correctly the first time according to spell check - had to look at the first time to spell it the second time though)
-Tina

Offline ejvc

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Re: Woodworking!!
« Reply #31 on: January 06, 2013, 02:37:34 PM »
I meant to post here but forgot -- we have been doing some woodworking at our place!  Charlotte got some child-sized tools for Christmas and we've been making a toolbox for her.  Woodworking is something I know little about but find super-fun.  It has even more gadgets than sewing!  I have stuck to basic hand tools (except a drill, as I only have an electric) and we are nearly all cut now.  Charlotte has been learning about measuring and sawing.  Fun!
My blog is at http://ejvc.wordpress.com

Sewing and machine knitting in Karlstad, Sweden!

Offline PixieCutLover

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Re: Woodworking!!
« Reply #32 on: January 18, 2013, 09:59:05 AM »
I like wood working to, I enjoy it most when I'm building a shed or adding on to my house. Because I can actually get inside of what I built and also do things like add windows and electrical wiring etc. I see 0 difference weather a man or woman does it though absolutely none at all.

I agree that society casts it as "a man thing" and sadly a lot of women buy into that corralling themselves within a limited aria of "feminine"  activitys. I want to pull my hair out when I see how intelligent and creative a lot of women actually are and they never go beyond home economics class as far as their activitys. Sure,  they may know how to prepare food like a french chef,  know every type of fabric, thread , yarn etc better than some people who make the stuff but it ends there They will never study chemistry, look through a microscope,  fly an air plane,  rebuild an old car or truck or anything else considered the realm of men. It reminds me of the stories of children discovered locked in closets since they were born and found s teenagers.
« Last Edit: January 18, 2013, 10:01:53 AM by PixieCutLover »

Offline Laurie H

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Re: Woodworking!!
« Reply #33 on: January 18, 2013, 01:52:18 PM »
On my side of the family, my mother might think "it's a man's thing", but she just prefers not to learn new things.  I've always hated that and I've really, really hated waiting around for someone else to take care of something that I just knew I could do myself.

On my hubby's side of the family, that wasn't a problem.  My DMIL knows her way around a toolbox and while she didn't always know how to fix something, she'd give it a good try.  She didn't have the internet to give her a printout of a manual like I do....DFIL has never been good about fixing things or saving manuals....so she did her best.  She could always build things and refinish a piece of furniture and recane seats from old chairs and make them look new.  I got my refinishing furniture skills from her. 

When DD and DSIL bought their house, the kitchen faucet wasn't working right and they hated it anyway.  They bought a new one and DD changed it out.  DSIL tried helping her but got frustrated and gave up.  DD called us when she was done, very happy because it was working correctly and not leaking.  Of course, she used her own tools that a friend of mine had given to her as a wedding gift. 

In our family, everyone is expected to know how to do things, many of us love woodworking.  Our grandson, who is 21 months, has toy tools and already loves to watch how to use them.  It won't be just Daddy, Uncle and his grandfather showing him how to use them.  Mom and Grandma can show him a thing or two.  After all, we're the ones who built the laundry room closet!  ;D
Laurie H

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Offline judith

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Re: Woodworking!!
« Reply #34 on: January 18, 2013, 02:43:20 PM »
I"m surprised to read comments that, in some parts of the world, there are apparent gender generalizations about hobbies. I'm old enough to be retired, but my generation, at least amoung my acquaintences, don't seem to have those biases.

I don't happen to be interested in woodworking - it's my husband's interest, he started out his working life as a journeyman carpenter and now it's a hobby and I'm happy to leave him to it. And home repair captures my interest about as much as vacuuming - in other words, not. When I was single, of course I did minor repairs. But it was from necessity, not entertainment. By the same token, neither I nor my acquaintences thought that there was anything special about doing those repairs. You just did what you had to do.
Most people are as happy as they allow themselves to be. (Abraham Lincoln)

 

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