Author Topic: Critique: Cashmerette Montrose  (Read 4831 times)

Offline Elephun

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Re: Critique: Cashmerette Montrose
« Reply #35 on: May 08, 2018, 01:05:16 AM »
Thanks for the instruction on the horizontal balance lines, Susan. I do understand the concept of balance lines, but it's hard for me to put the concept into practice. Your explanation for how to use them to find where to add length in the upper back is really helpful. I sewed a muslin of the other view with the yoke. Not sure I want to fiddle with it right now, but that's a great idea to try to let that yoke seam out a bit when I'm working with it again.  I hope you enjoy sewing it!

I put a shoulder pad in, but I haven't gotten a look at it from behind yet. I explained the purpose of the shoulder pad to my husband and he seemed vaguely positive about the way it looks, but I think he was just talking. I asked him about the pattern on the fabric lining up once I put the shoulder pad in, and he was much more certain about this. He said the pattern lines up with the CB seam on my jeans.

Offline kushami

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Re: Critique: Cashmerette Montrose
« Reply #36 on: August 03, 2018, 03:40:23 AM »
Elephun, I just wanted to say – what a fabulous result! I love the geometric fabric, and you got such a nice fit.

Offline Susan in Saint John

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Re: Critique: Cashmerette Montrose
« Reply #37 on: August 03, 2018, 10:31:09 AM »
I have a muslin of the Montrose on my dressform right now.  I needed to let it out at the waist and add shoulder darts for a rounded back.  Finally, I need to add about 1" at the sleeve cap so that the horizontal balance line on the sleeve was parallel to the floor.  This of course has resulted in extra ease in the sleeve cap which I now need to resolve.

Offline Elephun

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Re: Critique: Cashmerette Montrose
« Reply #38 on: August 03, 2018, 08:09:09 PM »
Thanks, kushami!

Susan in Saint John, it sounds like you are on your way with this one. I would probably take a little break before dealing with the sleeve cap ease, myself.

Offline Susan in Saint John

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Re: Critique: Cashmerette Montrose
« Reply #39 on: August 03, 2018, 09:53:29 PM »
I have encountered this problem before. 

I'm not sure if it's my body or the pattern drafting or maybe designers think that the sleeve hem on an angle is attractive.  Had I used the full bicep sleeve provided as part of this pattern, the situation would have been worse because the sleeve cap has been lowered to increase the bicep -- think of the sleeve cap as a piece of string which stays the same length.  You have to lower the cap to make it wider at the bicep line but it does keep the sleeve cap seam the same length so you can sew it in.  [Rather than add to the cap height, you could extend the shoulder until the bicep line is parallel to the floor but this is quite a different look -- basically a shirt sleeve rather than a fitted sleeve.]

For this pattern, if I make the view with the yoke and gathers at the centre back, I would be using a soft fabric which drapes nicely so I think the excess ease in the sleeve could be gathers at the shoulder seam -- repeating a design element.

If I decide on a fabric that does not gather nicely, there are several options including sewing a dart or a tuck/inverted tuck at the shoulder seam.  The dart could be converted to a seam.  This would also provide the opportunity to do something at the sleeve hem.  I should note that the hems on this pattern are 1/2" which I find pretty skimpy.  I prefer something more substantial -- an easy change to make.  Adding the seam is probably what I'll do.

I did try Sandra Betzina's trick of running the ease all the way around the sleeve but I wasn't happy with it -- probably works best if you've less to ease in than I do.  The other thing I thought about was dropping the armhole (Connie Crawford's recommendation in her Butterick patterns).  This would increase the bodice seam to match the eased sleeve seam.  The result is a larger armhole which I am not sure I want.

The Montrose is a classic shape and as such there are all kinds of design opportunities once you have the pattern fitting -- a TNT.  Doing something to exaggerate the sleeve cap is an option -- by adding even more ease, my problem would be solved.  I won't play with this until later.

I'd love to see Cashmerette include a 2 dart option for the larger cup sizes because once your bust dart gets over a certain size it gets tricky to sew.

I've house guests arriving on Sunday so I'm not going to work on this until after they leave.  Time for things to percolate!

Offline Lisanne

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Re: Critique: Cashmerette Montrose
« Reply #40 on: August 04, 2018, 08:37:42 AM »
I'd love to see Cashmerette include a 2 dart option for the larger cup sizes because once your bust dart gets over a certain size it gets tricky to sew.

If you're comfortable with changing the sleeve head so much - what about slash/spread the dart to divide it into 2 ?
Does this bring you joy, calm, confidence  :D  if not, try something else.

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Offline Susan in Saint John

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Re: Critique: Cashmerette Montrose
« Reply #41 on: August 04, 2018, 11:28:16 AM »
Yes, I've done that before a couple of times.  I was just thinking that a 2 dart option was something helpful for those not so comfortable with altering patterns.

I generally just baste the darts because during the fitting process you find out how the fabric really wants to behave and drape in the darts.