Author Topic: Spring 2012 Reading  (Read 62851 times)

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Offline fzxdoc

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Spring 2012 Reading
« on: March 23, 2011, 09:30:56 PM »
I've locked the Winter Reading topic. You can read the last posts here.

Now let's think about reading on the deck in the spring sunshine! :)

Kathryn

edited to change the topic title from Autumn to Winter as the year progressed...

and now edited for the arrival of a beautiful early Spring
« Last Edit: March 17, 2012, 01:55:31 PM by fzxdoc »

Offline the OTHER Mom to 5 aka Tee

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Re: Spring Reading
« Reply #1 on: March 23, 2011, 11:14:47 PM »
perfect timing...I ordered a refurbished "Nook" just yesterday....Im an Greek mythology geek and as of late interested in the American classics....   

Offline fzxdoc

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Re: Spring Reading
« Reply #2 on: March 23, 2011, 11:59:51 PM »
Ooooh, you're going to love that Nook, Tee. Is it a color one with a touch screen? Fortunately for you, many American classics and Greek mythology books are available for free on the Nook. Happy reading!

Kathryn

Offline the OTHER Mom to 5 aka Tee

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Re: Spring Reading
« Reply #3 on: March 24, 2011, 12:07:42 AM »
Ooooh, you're going to love that Nook, Tee. Is it a color one with a touch screen? Fortunately for you, many American classics and Greek mythology books are available for free on the Nook. Happy reading!

Kathryn

no, its the B & W version but I got it for less than $100 so I cant complain...   my local library also has books for download...Im looking forward to downloading & puttign my feet up

Offline miranda

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Re: Spring Reading
« Reply #4 on: March 24, 2011, 01:36:09 AM »
My book club met the other day and discussed "The 19th Wife".  It generated a lot of discussion.

The next book is "Remarkable Creatures".  Has anyone read that?

Kathryn, I'm sorry to see the end of the "winter reading" thread, as the thought of winter was the only thing that kept me going in the last few months!!!  LOL at myself.  We've just had the most vile summer, hot, humid, revolting - the kind of weather where you can't move.  We're in "autumn" now, and although it will still be 95F today, it is *much* better than it was.  I can't wait for the real relief of winter though.

Miranda

Offline gabrielle

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Re: Spring Reading
« Reply #5 on: March 24, 2011, 02:53:00 AM »
I've just finished Denise Mina's Paddy Meehan series (or maybe it's just meant to be a trilogy). They are very well-written crime novels set in Glasgow and environs. I really love the heroine, a young journalist struggling to make a name for herself while coping with her family and miscellaneous criminal shenanigans. Oh, and it's set in the '80s, which is fun if you're at all interested in the pre-internet days of journalism.

Offline DeniseM

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Re: Spring Reading
« Reply #6 on: March 24, 2011, 12:08:31 PM »
Miranda, if you miss winter reading, feel free to drop by and sit on my porch in Mass. where there's snow. Bring a book.  :rotfl:

I'm waiting for either Kindle to come out in color or to get my Motorola Xoom that has the Kindle app.

Offline Ambimom

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Re: Spring Reading
« Reply #7 on: March 24, 2011, 04:28:49 PM »
My book club met the other day and discussed "The 19th Wife".  It generated a lot of discussion.

Did you know that they made a Lifetime movie of that book?  The movie was kinda crappy.  It glosses over the miseries foisted upon Brigham Young's 19th wife, Eliza and concentrates on the modern murder mystery.   I happened to catch it while I was reading Favorite Wife:  Escape from Polygamy  What a huge contrast!   After reading how Susan Ray was seduced at 16, impregnated repeatedly and forced to live in abject poverty, while still pining after her much-older and mostly absent husband, I could not bear to read another page of the fictional 19th Wife when the reality was so much more dramatic. 

Polygamy fascinates me.  I was an avid watcher of "Big Love," and now "Sister Wives."  After reading "Favorite Wife," I realize that "Big Love" is merely a fantasy with some allusions to reality; "Sister Wives" is not all that it seems.  A lot of key stuff is deliberately omitted, like their finances.   The more that is revealed about the family on "Sister Wives," the more creeped out I become.  Meri's brother was married to Janelle, which is how she met Kody....so Meri's sister-in-law divorced her brother to become her co-wife; and Kody's father is married to one of his son's mother-in-laws as well as to his mother.....Yeech!   

I do admire the women for their obvious decency and forbearance but I want to shout at each of them for their worship of the man not worthy of any one of them. I suspect it was he who got them this reality show gig which has placed his wives and children in all sorts of legal jeopardy.  He seems to me like an overgrown, irresponsible surfer dude.  But what do I know?

To each his own; if that's they way they want to live, so be it.   

If you want a true account of living the polygamous life, I highly recommend Favorite Wife:  Escape from Polygamy

Offline Carolyn

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Re: Spring Reading
« Reply #8 on: March 24, 2011, 04:47:56 PM »
Ambimom,
Thanks for the suggestion.  I'll have to read "Favorite Wife".  I read 19th wife and enjoyed it.  I can't imagine what those women went through back in Brigham Young's day and continue to go through today.  It's as if they are just property much inferior to men.  Because of the dominance of men over their wives, I kept wondering how much higher the rate of domestice violence must be in these homes.
Carolyn

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Offline fzxdoc

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Re: Spring Reading
« Reply #9 on: March 28, 2011, 02:36:44 PM »
I admit a fascination for polygamy as well, Ambimom, perhaps because it's such an unnatural situation. Gosh, sometimes it's tough going with just monogamy! ;D  Adding more spouses to the mix can't be a peaceable thing, I would think.

Is Favorite Wife a recent book, or is it the book that Eliza wrote after she got away from that Brigham Young?

Kathryn


Offline Ambimom

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Re: Spring Reading
« Reply #10 on: March 28, 2011, 03:10:07 PM »
@fzxdoc,
No, it's not the book written by Brigham Young's wife Eliza on which The 19th Wife is based.  It is written by a woman who was raised among a "fundamentalist" sect led by the LeBaron brothers.  It's available on Kindle http://www.amazon.com/Favorite-Wife-Susan-Ray-Schmidt/dp/1599214946/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1301323324&sr=8-1

Funnily enough, several other wives and female relatives of Verlan LeBaron (Susan Ray's polygamous first husband) wrote similar memoirs, the links to which are also on that Amazon page.  I was going to read them all just to see if Ray's sister wives tell a different tale, but it was all so upsetting, I decided to postpone reading them for a while. I try hard not to be judgmental and to be open minded about other world views, but reading this book was like slowing down to see a fatal road accident.  It's simultaneously riveting and repulsing.

Susan Ray (or her ghostwriter) is an excellent story teller and a fine writer. She masterfully illustrates many things about living in a tight-knit, homogeneous community that are seductive:  the sense of purpose, the shared struggle, the camaraderie. Which is why I suppose that once Susan Ray finally escaped, she chose an only slightly less repressive church doctrine under which to live.  To each his own.  I cannot presume to judge another's religious philosophy, as foreign as it is to me.


Offline the OTHER Mom to 5 aka Tee

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Re: Spring Reading
« Reply #11 on: March 28, 2011, 03:18:29 PM »
so according to UPS, my Nook will be delivered today.... and I have already perused the library for a book to download...  going with The Friday Night Knitting Club for starters...

The Review sold me on it

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USA Today...
"Kate Jacobs's breezy first novel reads like Steel Magnolias set in Manhattan."

Offline miranda

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Re: Spring Reading
« Reply #12 on: March 29, 2011, 02:40:17 AM »
LOL Denise!

I lived in Winnipeg as a kid - is the climate where you live like there?

Miranda

Offline Pipsy

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Re: Spring Reading
« Reply #13 on: March 29, 2011, 09:05:03 AM »
For those interested in polygamy there is a court case going on in British Columbia at this time.  For the first time there are going to be camera's in a Canadian court room starting on Mon 28 th.  It has been a very controversial case that has been going on for awhile and changing directions.  For those of you interested you can Google both CTV and CBC television (or try Global as well, all these are our national TV news stations). I am sorry I do not have any more info than that. I think the current direction in attempting to outlaw polygamy at a BC complex in Bountiful BC is based on whether child abuse is occurring and particularly whether it is child sexual abuse. News here sometimes is full of info and then dies down only to come up again. Human rights groups as well as religious freedom groups are following with interest.  If you go to CBC News on line and search for Bountiful you will find some interesting articles and especially some interesting discussion of things I had never thought of.

As someone who was on the cutting age of the women's movement when it started in mid 1960s with publications of Betty Friedan and the other one (oh these senior moments) I am appalled that so little movement has been made in so many sectors and question many changes that have occurred in other areas.  I am tired of of those who don't consider women equal or who feel they are protecting women with controlling behaviours and relationships. One day our minister approached a myself and a friend after church to ask if we would start a women's group for younger stay at home women. I am afraid we both groaned and refused. "Been there, done that". We were both working at the time yet had had our few years at home. Personal freedom is a mind set and a journey many need to make on their own, usually with some sort of assistance or support, but they must be willing to have open minds to change and accept the consequences. Unfortunately, fear predominates for so many.
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Offline fzxdoc

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Re: Spring Reading
« Reply #14 on: March 29, 2011, 01:41:24 PM »
Tee, let us know how you like The Friday Night Knitting Club and your new Nook. I hope you love them both.

Pipsy, thanks for the info. I'm afraid I'm much like Ambimom in that I can only read about polygamy in small doses because its victimization of women is so upsetting. It's hard to imagine that such situations can perpetuate in this day and age. I hope that Canadian case finds favorably for the women and children involved.

I just finished reading The Glass Castle in preparation for reading Half Broke Horses for our book club next week.  Parental irresponsibility leading to child victimization is another hot button, so I found some of the reading particularly tough going. What amazes me is how deeply children continue to love and to forgive parents who harm them. Friends who work in Childrens Support Services say those feelings in victimized children are more common than not, though. I found the majority of the book very sad. Hopefully Jeannette Walls' second book will be more uplifting.

Kathryn


Offline Ambimom

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Re: Spring Reading
« Reply #15 on: March 29, 2011, 02:12:00 PM »
On a lighter note, I am reading Jane Eyre at the moment and really, really enjoying it.  Quite the budding feminist is Ms. Eyre!  What a revelation.  I had a memory of reading Jane Eyre when I was about 12 or 13, but I must have been confusing it with some other book because the book I'm reading is nothing as I remember.  Jane Eyre is quite the opposite from the mousy little victim portrayed in all those movies and television adaptations. 

I also recently got to see the BBC adaptation of D.H. Lawrence's Women in Love, another favorite book of my early 20s.  I remember identifying with Gudrun while reading it.  And I'll never forget the Ken Russell movie adaptation of the book starring Oliver Reed and Alan Bates in their absolute prime!  OMG that wrestling scene between those two is burned into my brain.  Glenda Jackson's portrayal of Gudrun was superb. 

Well this current BBC version is nothing like I recall from the book either.  It is a ponderous, confusing and incomprehensible mess.

Is it me or my memory that is to blame?

Offline karent

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Re: Spring Reading
« Reply #16 on: March 29, 2011, 06:21:57 PM »
Has anyone read In The Sanctuary of Outcasts?  by Neil White?  A friend just started it, a non-fiction book about a person (man I think) imprisoned in a white collar prison which also housed a population of people suffering from Hansen's Disease (leprosy.)  I don't know much more about it, saw her mention it on FB, I'm going to Amazon to look it up now.  K

Offline Janis

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Re: Spring Reading
« Reply #17 on: March 29, 2011, 06:54:00 PM »
Hopefully Jeannette Walls' second book will be more uplifting.

Kathryn

Kathryn, it was a disturbing book, but to me the uplifting part was how all of the children individually overcame their incredible childhoods.  Also, I loved Wall's writing style.
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Offline judith

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Re: Spring Reading
« Reply #18 on: March 29, 2011, 08:05:15 PM »
For those interested in polygamy there is a court case going on in British Columbia at this time.  For the first time there are going to be camera's in a Canadian court room starting on Mon 28 th.  It has been a very controversial case that has been going on for awhile and changing directions.  For those of you interested you can Google both CTV and CBC television (or try Global as well, all these are our national TV news stations). I am sorry I do not have any more info than that.


Pipsy, the cameras will be in the courtroom only for closing arguments. The jury is still out (no pun intended) on the question of allowing cameras in Canadian courts, although CPAC does carry supreme court proceedings - they are usually very dry, though, and you definately would need to be interested in the finer points of legal interpretations, or suffering from intense insomnia, to sit through for any length of time.

The question before the courts re polygamy is whether Canada's law against polygamist marriages is unconstitutional. Although I am offended, as a person, by the purported actions of this particular religious group, I do think that much of the media coverage about this case has had little to do with the actual question at hand. Frankly, I wish we would use our other laws to protect children and not delve into the question of freedom of religion, because I do think that this particular court case is not the solution we are looking for.
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Offline karent

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Re: Spring Reading
« Reply #19 on: March 29, 2011, 08:35:34 PM »
I also find the idea of living in a polygamist relationship somewhat intriguiging, not because I would but because I don't understand it.  I am a big fan of Jon Krakauer's writing, though, and I was so disturbed by his book Under The Banner of Heaven, which I read some years ago when it first came out, that I could not even finish the last few chapters.  It includes pieces of the more violent early days of the Mormon faith, how the polygamists split from the modern Mormons/LDS (who do NOT support or recognize the "wild type" polygamist branch) and is much more open about some of the more brutal and more anti-social ways of polygamist branch.  Not just the violence involved in keeping people (ie. mostly women but some men) in line, and from leaving, but also so much of the illegalities such as large families living off state funding with multiple women in one tribe registering as single mothers to recieve government benefits.  A much less "Big Love" view, and was actually so upsetting to me that I have not had any desire to read or watch any of the newest breed of polygamist literature/viewing.  I don't know if anyone who has not actually lived it will ever truly know what it is like.  K

Add:  it included discussion of what, if I recall correctly, are the two large sects currently existing in North America.  One is in BC, and the other in, I think, far Northwest Arizona.  K

Offline fzxdoc

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Re: Spring Reading
« Reply #20 on: March 29, 2011, 08:43:11 PM »
Oh, what a tough read that book that was, Karen. Hypnotizing yet scary all in one. Even my DH was mesmerized by it, and it takes a lot to have that effect on him. I think Jon Krakauer did a fine job with it but he was roundly criticized for the purported bias in his writing.

Kathryn
« Last Edit: March 29, 2011, 08:44:47 PM by fzxdoc »

Offline Elona

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Re: Spring Reading
« Reply #21 on: March 30, 2011, 12:54:16 AM »
...some of the more brutal and more anti-social ways of polygamist branch.  Not just the violence involved in keeping people (ie. mostly women but some men) in line, and from leaving, but also so much of the illegalities such as large families living off state funding with multiple women in one tribe registering as single mothers to recieve government benefits.  
Add:  it included discussion of what, if I recall correctly, are the two large sects currently existing in North America.  One is in BC, and the other in, I think, far Northwest Arizona.  K

In Arizona, it's Colorado City (oddly enough).  A scientist friend has done research in the area for decades and he says it's a shameless welfare scam, with the wives living in dormitory-like structures, and the 'husband' living off their status as unwed mothers.  Ye gods!

But if you want more examples of this kind of abuse of women in our very own country, do a little research on the status of women within Amish communities:

http://aboutamish.blogspot.com/2010/09/sexual-abuse-among-amish_08.html


Closed communities have the license of all kinds of disgusting practices, especially when they are cloaked in what they are pleased to call 'religion,' a perversion of the term.

eta: opening bracket to opening quote tag  :)
« Last Edit: March 30, 2011, 01:27:12 AM by Lisa »

Offline Carolyn

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Re: Spring Reading
« Reply #22 on: March 30, 2011, 01:28:59 AM »
Elona,
Thank you for the link.  That was a very interesting article.  We tend to romanticize Amish communities and forget they have the same social problems as mainstream society, only intensified due to the islolation.  I have never had an Amish client, but having worked as a social worker for almost 25 years, I find that the most isolated are the most at risk for abuse, women and children.  It becomes even more complicated when strong fundamental religion is involved.  I was the therapist for a teenager sexually abused by her youth minister several years ago.  She would not report it to her church because it would require her to do it publicly in front of all  the "elders" and the perpetrator.  What 15 year old has the strength to do that, especially after being abused?
Carolyn

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Offline miranda

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Re: Spring Reading
« Reply #23 on: March 30, 2011, 03:34:55 AM »
Carolyn, that's awful. Poor kid. I'm curious, though, why she couldn't report it without having to face all of them?

Miranda

Offline fzxdoc

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Re: Spring Reading
« Reply #24 on: March 30, 2011, 09:56:08 AM »
Elona, I had no idea about woman and child abuse among the Amish, but it makes sense that it is as potentially prevalent there as in an open society. The crime is exacerbated by the fact that apparently the women and children receive no support from their church. I would hope that perhaps there is a subculture of support in closed communities where women and children help each other, but that does not address the issues of justice for the victims or eliminating pedophiles from that community. A very sad business indeed.

I have begun reading Half Broke Horses, and although I'm only about 1/4 into it, I don't find it as interesting a read as Jeanette Walls' first book. At this point the story seems superficial and predictable. I hope it gets better.

Kathryn
« Last Edit: March 30, 2011, 09:57:56 AM by fzxdoc »

Offline Carolyn

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Re: Spring Reading
« Reply #25 on: March 30, 2011, 01:41:14 PM »
Miranda, in her church, that is the only way to face your accuser.  Also, any major decisions that had to be made were done through the elders, not the parents.  For instance, if you wanted to go to the prom with someone outside of your church, you had to go before the elders.  She was so afraid others would find out what happened to her, she traveled to a different town to see me for therapy.

I can't remember all the details because it's been over 20 years ago, but I do know it had been reported to the authorities.  I'm not sure how that investigation coincided with the church hierarchy. 

On a lighter note, I am reading a very interesting book - The Hangman's Daughter.  It was one I got for free on my Kindle.  You never know the quality of the free books, but I'm actually enjoying this one.  It is set in the 17th century in Bavaria and is a mystery/historical fiction.  The historical details have been similar to Ken Follet's World Without End in regards to medical procedures/ attitudes regarding physicians/social issues after the plague.  It is written by a European journalist who is a descendant of a long list of Executioners (Hangmen).  He had researched his family and the role of executioners in society when he decided to write a novel.  I'm only a third through it, but so far so good.
Carolyn

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Offline fzxdoc

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Re: Spring Reading
« Reply #26 on: March 30, 2011, 04:56:04 PM »
I've seen The Hangman's Daughter offered on all three venues: Kindle, Nook, and iBooks for free. With your recommendation, Carolyn, I think I'll download it and give it a go. Nothing to lose, really, now that I know it's an interesting read. Thanks!

Kathryn


Offline BeeBee

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Re: Spring Reading
« Reply #27 on: March 30, 2011, 05:32:00 PM »
The Hangman's Daughter by Oliver Potzsch?  When I look for it, it's $7.99.

Offline Carolyn

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Re: Spring Reading
« Reply #28 on: March 30, 2011, 05:39:37 PM »
Usually, books are offered free for a limited time on Amazon.
Carolyn

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Offline fzxdoc

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Re: Spring Reading
« Reply #29 on: March 30, 2011, 05:43:50 PM »
Oh shoot, I may have missed the window of opportunity as well. Sigh. I'll check Nook and iBooks.

Kathryn

Offline Pina

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Re: Spring Reading
« Reply #30 on: April 07, 2011, 03:48:45 PM »
Hi,I listened to "Fatal Error" by J.A.Jance,"An Amish Christmas" by Cynthia Keller and "Homecoming" by Cathy Kelly.This morning I added the following book titles from my library's new April audio CD book list to my request list,"How To Be Compassionate: A Handbook for Creating Inner Peace and a Happier World" by Dalai Lama XIV Bstan-'dzin-rgya-mtsho,"And Furthermore" by Judi Dench,"Day After Night" by Anita Diamant,"Silent Mercy" by Linda A.Fairstein and "No! I Don't Want to Join a Book Club" by Virginia Ironside.
Currently I'm listening to "Too Late to Say Goodbye" by Ann Rule.



Offline fzxdoc

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Re: Spring Reading
« Reply #31 on: April 07, 2011, 05:49:15 PM »
Pina, I haven't read an Ann Rule book in quite some time. What's Too Late to Say Goodbye about?  

I really admire you for using your local library system to line up your audiobook selections from month to month. I'm still checking the audiobooks on CD out of the library and uploading them via AudiobookBuilder for the Mac onto the Books section of my iTunes library. From there they get selected for listening on my iPod. Just downloading audiobooks from the library would save me a lot of work. However, the last time I checked, the availability of audiobooks from our library system is limited. It's nice that you have a good collection to choose from. Enjoy it for me. :)

I am currently reading Ron Perlstein's Nixonland, which is fascinating. There is so much modern history that I know nothing about, or only know about through casual allusion by pop culture. This book focuses on the Nixon years in the White House but also gives a lot of detail about his upbringing and early career. When they said that the 60s were tumultuous, I had no idea just how tumultuous that decade (and the early 70s as well) was until I read this book. I keep telling myself that Perlstein, a strong liberal, is writing about Nixon, a conservative, so I should take his commentary with a grain of salt. Even with a big grain of salt, some of the events that I am now learning about are too scarily fantastic to be believed. No wonder we don't trust politicians very much.

And speaking of not trusting politicians, I recently finished reading Andrew Young's book about John Edwards, The Politician. Since Young was a former Edwards aide and confidante (and for a while the "father" of his 5th child), it was also a big grain of salt time with this book. Again, even if only portions of it are unbiased truth, it's pretty astounding how someone with so many blessings and such a great future ahead chose to derail his life and those of his ailing wife and his children.

I'm almost ready for a low-salt reading diet for a change.

Kathryn

Edited to spell the author's name correctly.
« Last Edit: April 09, 2011, 03:55:37 PM by fzxdoc »

Offline Janis

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Re: Spring Reading
« Reply #32 on: April 07, 2011, 06:36:30 PM »
I am currently reading The Taliban Shuffle by Kim Barker.  It was written by the niece of a friend of mine.  She was the South Asian Bureau Chief for the Chicago Tribune for several years, and spent most of her time in Afghanistan and Pakistan.  The book was written as a cathartic endeavor when Kim came back to the states. 

It is mostly a memoir of her life as a correspondent in a war zone, the adrenaline addiction of that, and how many correspondents deal with it.  Also, she talks about the difficulty of returning to the "normal world".  Kim is very self deprecating, and talks openly about how naive she was when she went to this area of the world, the mistakes she made, and what she learned.

There is a lot of gallows humor here, which I find realistic under the circumstances.  Besides, I have a very dark sense of humor, so it fit my sensibilities.  But, if you don't find anything in war to laugh about, or can't see the absurdity, you may not like this book.
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Offline Carolyn

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Re: Spring Reading
« Reply #33 on: April 07, 2011, 06:43:44 PM »
Janis, The Taliban Shuffle sounds intriguing.  I'll have to check it out.

Kathryn, I've been wanting to read the Andrew Young book.  As a "once" admirer of John Edward's commitment to the plight of the poor, I have been so disappointed in his life choices.  It's interesting what power can do to us.

In regards to Nixon, I have heard and read several times that he would now be considered quite liberal among Republicans.  It's interesting how politics can swing like a pendulum.
Carolyn

"If God had intended for us to stay one waist size, he wouldn't have invented elastic"...  Christee Gabour Atwood

Blog:  http://carolynobryan.blogspot.com/

Offline Pina

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Re: Spring Reading
« Reply #34 on: April 08, 2011, 06:30:47 PM »
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Pina, I haven't read an Ann Rule book in quite some time. What's Too Late to Say Goodbye about?
Hi Kathryn,"Too Late to Say Goodbye" by Ann Rule,a former Seattle,WA police officer,is about a true story of murder and betrayal.The audio book is narrated by Karen Ziemba.I like her voice and have listened to other books she narrated too.

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It's nice that you have a good collection to choose from. Enjoy it for me.
My library is affiliated with 24 community libraries in our area.Most of the audio books I request come from other libraries.The Merritt,British Columbia public library has taken learning to the Xtreme this year."The program involves signing out books that are accompanied by related pieces of equipment,giving the patron an interactive learning experience.Other equipment available,either donated or purchased by Merritt Friends of the Library include a GPS device for geocaching,E-reader,snowshoes,passes to fitness centres in Merritt, binoculars,fly-tying lessons,Nordic walking poles,mountain bikes,and a cross-country ski pass to Kane Valley."
I hope the program is successful and will expand across the country. ;)

 

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